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Thread: Yet another sundew screwed!

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    Yet another sundew screwed!

    Hi it's been a while since I've posted anything. But my (i'm guessing 7th so far) sundew is trouble. I saw this shiny silver larvae in the peat. I don't know what it's called (im a newbie), but i pretty sure it chomps up the roots. When I saw this I started weeping like a baby 'cause the other sundews died shortly after i saw 'em. I feel so helpless . If this killed the other sundews I had I want revenge! So any suggestions what it might be and how to destroy this ? Pretty pretty please with 100 cherries on top?
    Extra info: I've been recently seeing these small black flying insects the size of fruit flies around pots of other plants. Again if this is something obvious I'm sorry for my lack of knowledge, I am a beginner.

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    cpsammich's Avatar
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    Waterkirby would tell you to "kill them with fire"

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Probably fungus gnat larvae. Try Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis). You can find it readily in the US sold as "Mosquito Dunks". Break off a small chunk and float it in your trays or put it in a container of water overnight and water your plants with that. Being a biological control at takes time to work - affects larvae only so you have to treat active infestations long enough to get 4 generations of the fungus gnats - 4 to 6 weeks.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    LeafKirby's Avatar
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    Tis true, but if your Dundee is old enough, they shall be its next meal. So just ignore em for now. if you see a bunch of em,take out your plant, wash it the roots. Take the soil and use the microwaves to make them die by fire,then repot. But its just better to top your soil with sand if you're worried.


    Editr take his advice.

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    The BTI might be a good idea, but I live in a country that it's difficult to find (Poland). Also I have no experience in repotting or, in this case, taking the plant out and putting it back in. There is a 60% chance that I'll crush the root system doing so.
    I have also read that you can kill them with diluted (0,1%) solution of hydrogen peroxide. But the commertial antiseptic solution contains stabilizers and other aditives so it's pretty risky using that one. I'm also concerned about the free radical oxygen in the H2O2.

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    A layer of silica sand at least 1 cm thick on top of the media will prevent fungus gnat infestations. I don't know how effective it is if the soil is already infested.

    Fungus gnats will leave a silvery trail on the surface similar (but much thinner) to what a snail or slug will leave.

    A drench with a pesticide like Pyrethrum would probably kill the larvae, eggs and pupae however any adults around would just lay more eggs. You'd have to eliminate the adults or mulch with sand to prevent reinfestations. Have you seen any of the adult gnats? They usually stay near the soil and will probably be getting caught by the sundews.

    What species are you growing?
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    It's an alice sundew and yes some tiny insects have been caught.

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    jesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superplant96 View Post
    The BTI might be a good idea, but I live in a country that it's difficult to find (Poland).
    If you are in a country where BTI is rarely used, there is a chance that it may work. In other countries gnats and fungus gnats have developed resistances against BTI so that even high doses cannot do much harm to the larvae in many cases. BTI may work or not, it solely depends on the resistance status of the fungus gnat population you have.

    Normally you have to use either chemical insecticides or useful creatures (predatory mites) to fight fungus gnats efficiently. In Germany predatory mites are used relatively often, but you always have to order fresh culture to use them, pricing and quantity is calculated to use them in big greenhouses, so they are of no use if you want to fight fungus gnats in a few small pots only.

    The brand names of allowed insecticides differ from country to country, so in the States nobody can tell you what insecticide against fungus gnats might be available in Poland. Even in different EU countries like Germany, other brands of insecticides are on the market. In Germany I use something from Bayer, named "Bayer Schädlingsfrei Calypso" or "Bayer Kombi-Schädlingsfrei", it is based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiacloprid

    Just look for an concentrated insecticide in your country that can be used against fungus gnats while watering the plants: The insecticide is first mixed with water, then poured over the substrate. The fungus gnat larvae will die - problem solved.

    For mixing small amounts I use a "disposable syringe" (but I use the same syringe over and over) to mix 2ml concentrated insecticide with 50 ml of water, then I use the same syringe to inject the mixed solution into the substrate where the fungus gnats live.

    You just have to find an insecticide in your country that can be used against fungus gnats. Perhaps there is a forum about carnivorous or other plants in your country where you can ask which brand names of insecticide are available in Poland against fungus gnats?

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