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Thread: D. capensis "alba"

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    D. capensis "alba"

    Hi.

    I won some D. capensis "alba" on ebay and now I have them I'm wondering should they be all white or can they have a redish color to them.

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    mcmcnair's Avatar
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    mine have never produced any pigmentation aside from chlorophyll. I believe the alba form is completely anthocyanin and carotenoid free. If your plants are producing pigment it is likely you don't have alba.
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    This has been the subject of much discussion both on the ICPS forum and ICPS listserv. In "The Savage Garden" Drosera capensis "Alba" is described as being similar to the narrow leaved form of D. capensis but with white flowers and transparent tentacles with pale pink glands. The term "alba" (Latin for white) is commonly used, e.g. forma alba, to denote a white flowered form of a plant though sometimes it is used when the plant is anthocyanin free.

    The Drosera capensis cultivar 'Albino' published description reads thusly: "After "growing-on" it became obvious that one plant was unusual for it presented a white flower and not the usual pink colour. The plant was propagated further by leaf cuttings and seed and was found to breed "true" (i.e. white flowers were produced). Another and probably more significant feature of the described form is the lack of red colouration in the leaves and tentacles under various lighting conditions, including strong sun."

    The cultivar standard photograph is cited as the one published in "The Savage Garden" as D. capensis "alba". Yet the photo appears to have pinkish tentacles, although this could be an artifact of the printing process. Since Latin or latinized forms is not acceptable for 'Albino' was used.

    If your plants have white flowers then they are "alba".


    The question remains if there are two white flowered forms, one with tentacles/glands that never show a pinkish color no matter the lighting conditions or one with tentacles/glands that take on a slight pink/champagne color in strong lighting conditions.

    Photographs have been hardly conclusive as the pink color may not be picked up or could simply be an optical effect from surrounding colors. So far no one has been able to come forth with an example the remains completely free of any pinkish color under all lighting conditions. If you indeed have such a D. capensis iI would like to obtain a few plants and seed to distribute to other ICPS growers to see if it indeed free of pinkish color in strong sunlight.
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    Thank you for your help. Looks like I will have to wait to see if I get white flowers.

    One was forming but not sure if it will open after being sent in the post.

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    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    ...and adding to NaN's post...
    The plants I've grown in a lower-light greenhouse appear to have tentacles completely devoid of pigment. However, the same clones grown under stronger lighting in a different greenhouse (or under fluorescent lights) look like the picture below (unfortunately, what some greenhouse managers consider full sun is different than others ):

    ...but unfortunately I don't have a picture of one in lower light since I didn't think it was as purty :P
    Visit The Sundew Grow Guides: http://www.growsundews.com
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