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Thread: Sundew seedlings question

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    Sundew seedlings question

    I have a pot of D. capensis seedlings sitting near a south-east-ish window, how much lighting is sufficient? I don't have any lighting setup, so speaking in sun terms, would they be ok in full sun in the morning and late afternoon, and partial sun in the midday? Some are still sprouting, but others germinated about 2 weeks ago. Advice?

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    My experience is that if most CPs get a minimum of 4 hours of direct sunlight in the winter they'll do okay. They may not get outstanding coloration but will grow without etoliation and will produce healthy flowers. The plants and flowers may tend to grow towards the window/light source but you can always rotate the pots so they'll grow straighter.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    The only concern I would have growing them in most places on Oahu is potentially the warmer conditions. I have a friend growing them in Alewa heights and says they do well, despite being warmer than my location in Kula. I just seem to remember one of our forum members saying they were difficult to grow in Singapore and suspect that it might be related to warmer and much more humid conditions there causing difficulty.

    I do grow mine outdoors in full sun in Kula. Conditions are a bit different in terms of temperature and UV light intensity do to the high elevation. But I would guess that full sun at a lower elevation would be fine, just you might want to gradually adjust them to that location if they were germinated in a different area. From what I was seeing with the plants (D. capensis Red)I sent to my friend in Alewa Heights they are not as red as they could be, but I have attributed that to the warmer conditions + less UV. I did send a bunch of seeds along to a teacher on the windward side and haven't hear how well they did....

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I think your best solution is the window that they are on, supplemented by artificial lighting, if possible.

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    Thanks for replying guys. I left them by the window for about the past week, but they seem to be dying? Only one has a carnivorous leaf, but the rest seem a bit droopy, yellow, and have long stems, so I'm guessing etiolation? Gradually adjusting them and a second pot to the outdoors, its been cloudy, but bright.

    As for the larger plants, do the leaves become broader if they get less sun/light? Also I noticed that more than one of my plants are sending up 2 flower stalks at once, why? Are the just happy, or stressed?

    @Kulamauiman- I live up Wahiawa, at about 1000' elevation, a bit cooler than the rest of the island, but not the same as up there in Kula.

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    Aloha Rae,
    I spent some time at the corner of California Ave and Dole Rd, i think way back in the 90's and spent a lot of time at the high school there. Yes it is cool enough to grow cymbidiums and some of the protea in your neck of the woods. If they were getting too little light I would suspect more skinny long leaves. So if anything you may be getting enough light to be happy if seeing wide shorter leaves. If flowering good sign. capensis is one that has tendency to produce copious amounts of seeds.

    Given lots of UV light and cool nights I see them looking like this

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    Wow, that is some beautiful coloration! Mine are not even close I backed off the seedlings, and stopped watching 'em like a hawk. And yeah since they give loads of seeds I'm not worried anymore.

    I know exactly where you mean, the view of the mountain range from there is so nice, and the trees lining the street look so sweet. Did you teach there at the school?

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    had a bunch of friends in the Agriculture Department. Would go and visit and on occasion when I needed to fabricate things ask the guys there for help

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