User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 11

Thread: Drosera Capensis help??

  1. #1
    Chasethorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Drosera Capensis help??

    I got this today for very cheap. I am not to sure how health it is. I trimed a lot of the dead leaves off and it looks better now. I am going to repot if nessecary. It is two D. Capensis's in one pot. I have it in a warm room with a full sun window at 60% humidity standing in some RO water. Here are some pics.

    when I first brought it home...


    Now...



    Chase

  2. #2
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Chase,
    Sundews (Drosera spp.) often look a bit rough for the first few weeks after being shipped, it's just how they are. So be patient and leave it in one place for at least a month to allow it time to settle in. Your plant looks perfectly healthy and will grow like mad in no time. Fortunately, capensis is one of the easiest of all the Sundews!

    Paul

  3. #3
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area, US
    Posts
    3,498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    no need to repot either. your plants look fine!
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
    +picture thread

  4. #4
    Chasethorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sweet I found a place local that sells them. The lady gave me is cheap because she thought it looked a little rough. I just trimmed and took some tweezers to it and cleaned it up. It has some babies all over the moss when I looked close. $5 was not such a bad deal
    Chase

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    945
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    for plants that size i would say you got a good deal. like everyone was saying capes are easy to grow and they look very healthy to me.

  6. #6
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D. capensis is so easy to grow, in fact, that in many collections it turns into a noxious weed (much like Utricularia bisquamata!) and has to be purged from pots where it's not wanted. I am constantly pulling plants of it from my Dioneae pots and from around the Sarracenia! So, watch out! You may not want to let it seed itself indiscriminately.

  7. #7
    Keith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    602
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    D. capensis is so easy to grow, in fact, that in many collections it turns into a noxious weed (much like Utricularia bisquamata!) and has to be purged from pots where it's not wanted. I am constantly pulling plants of it from my Dioneae pots and from around the Sarracenia! So, watch out! You may not want to let it seed itself indiscriminately.
    I was just wondering what negative effects having volunteer cape's around your sarr's has? I am getting into a "group planting" phase and earlier this year introduced some capensis around the bases of some of my taller sarr's. If this causes trouble, I will be glad to know about it while I still have an easy chance to "grub" the sundews back out.
    My Grow/Want Lists
    -The horticulturalist formerly known as Shortbus-

  8. #8
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The only "negative" effect is that you will find them growing everywhere and odds are you will grow tired of having to weed them out again and again. I do permit D. capensis to populate some of my Sarracenia plantings, since they do add texture and color, but they are not permitted inside my Nepenthes house, where they would get into everything. Curiously, I am finding D. burmanii seedlings in the Nepenthes pots now, but they seem much less aggressive, and hopefully will not become a problem. (They are prettier anyway!)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •