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Thread: Fertilizing Drosera & Sarracenia?

  1. #17
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Alright, I'll mist them a TINY bit with the ferts and see what happens.

    Does fertilizer do much good for drosera? Do they speed up in growth?

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    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    As far as I know the only Drosera that I can think of which benefits greatly or maybe is even dependent on fertilization through the soil is D. regia, who I guess behaves somewhat like a Sarracenia in that sense. Other Drosera, like others have said can benefit from light foliar feeding, which I imagine would give similar results as feeding with insects, though maybe minus some of the pain of actually using insects as well as maybe less of a chance of fungal growth from the presence of the organic solids.

    But D. regia really likes some (light?) soil fertilization, from what I have read.
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  3. #19
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    For long term growth health and vigor CPs need the nutrients that they get from digesting prey. If they only needed the carbohydrates from photosynthesis there would be no need for carnivory. With indoor grown plants given sufficient conditions such as temperature, light, water and humidity:

    If you have Drosera seedlings that stalled in terms of growth they will most likely benefit from feeding or fertilizing. If you have Drosera that flower but the flowers abort or have sparse seed sets they will probably benefit from feeding or fertilization. If you have Drosera that does not flower then they would probably benefit from feeding or fertilizing. Many rapid growing Drosera, typically annuals, will not survive or flower without adequate nutrition. Plants like Drosera linearis, D. uniflora, and D. arcturi will not survive dormancy unless they had adequate nutrition during their short growth periods (2-3 months). The Diva - Drosera glanduligera which grows so rapidly it produces new leaves every two to three days will not live to maturity if not adequately feed.

    If you find you don't have to feed your indoor seedlings it's probably because your environment is rich enough to support fauna in sufficient populations such as springtails.

    Feeding with crushed bloodworm, dried insects or fish food flakes/pellets is fine but often requires a cleanup a few days later. Otherwise you can get fungal growth from the undigested bits - fatal more often than not with seedlings. If you have only a few dozen plants and plenty of time on your hands more power to you. If not, look into foliar fertilizing with liquid fertilizers.
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    Gardening freak! tommyr's Avatar
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    I crush up fish food very finely and sprinkle a SMALL amount on my dews once in a blue moon. No problems at all. I do not feed my Sarrs.
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  5. #21

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    I would say to take the drosera you have the most of and test the fertilizer out on ONE plant. Separate it from the others but give it the same light/humidity and all that. If the plant survives the first fertilization, try the twice a month method on the plant and after a couple months, compare it to the other drosera and see if it made a difference.

  6. #22
    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    Here's what I do with my Drosera and Sarracenia seedlings.

    I feed my Drosera once a week with freeze dried daphnia. It's small and light enough that it's absorbed by the leaves before fungus even has a chance to think about growing. I know that Daphnia doesn't have many nutrients in it, but the plants want the Nitrogen and Phosphorous, which is all in the shell. The entire freeze dried animal is dissolved within a few days (hours for the pygmies). The growth rates I've been achieving can't really be argued with. For D. cistiflora I've been doing this twice a week to get them as large as possible before summer.

    For Sarracenia seedlings I give them a 1/4 diluted foliar spray of orchid fertilizer once a week. We managed to take S. purpurea from seed to 3 inch long mature shaped leaves in less than a year with this method. I do the same thing, but my growth rate at home has been much slower. It helps to flush the media with pure water once a month.

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    Isn't S. purpurea one of the slowest growing Sarracenia? What were the conditions of the S. purpurea? I didn't even consider fertilizing my S. oreophila (when they are done with cold stratification and planted and finally sprout). How old should a plant be before they are fertilized?

  8. #24
    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    Purps are pretty slow. They'll grow at about any temperature as long as it's not enough to trigger dormancy. You can fertilize as soon as the first leaves show up.

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