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Thread: Drosera graminifolia and D. spiralis, re described..

  1. #9

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    P.S. In case you want to compare the regular glandular trichomes of D.spiralis with the "TSG" trichomes of D.graminifolia, Dani O. posted some cool macro pics on CPUK last year: http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index...54&hl=spiralis
    Last edited by Fernando Rivadavia; 01-02-2014 at 11:09 AM.

  2. #10
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    I appreciate the detailed description of the differences between D. spiralis and D. graminifolia, Fernando. The 'forget the thread leaves' idea certainly does make it all more clear. 'Sounds like D. graminifolia is on the rare side in cultivation.

    The new species is certainly one of the most exciting new things I've seen in the genus. Congratulations! 'Can't wait to hear about it in cultivation.
    - Mark

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    Hello Mark,

    I'm glad my long explanation made sense, thanks for the patience to read it all.

    Yes, D.graminifolia is exceptionally rare both in the wild and in cultivation, unfortunately.

    As for the new species, it is even rarer in the wild (only known from on site), but will hopefully be easier in cultivation than D.graminifolia. However the habitats of the two are very similar, so don't keep your hopes up... :/


    Best wishes,
    Fernando Rivadavia

  4. #12
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Thank you Fernando for further clarifying the thought processes. I had read the paper several months ago and remember the "forget the threadleaved" paradigm. Mindset can certainly affect perception. A lot of the devil is in the details but you also have to compare populations as well as individual plants. People get the "it's just D. capensis" when they see D. villosa (even Saint Hilaire noted the similarity in his diagnosis). The devil between the two species is in things like the stipules, hairs/glands on the petioles/lamina/flower stalk/sepals etc.

    When examining the AgriStarts 3 plant since I had questions about the circinate leaf vernation I compared what details I could - shape of leaf tips and cross-section, shape of stipules, presence/absence of trichomes and sessile glands on the leaves, anthers and stigma. I couldn't compare flower stalks or sepals or seeds. On the basis of these I had determined it was most likely D. spiralis. Your explanation on variable leaf growth makes sense. It would seem that while the cricinate leaf vernation is and obvious and important species identifier it really isn't the most significant one. An example of an obvious, important and very/most significant identifier would be the flower stalk on the re-discovered D. ascendens.

    I try to impress upon people not to rely on one characteristic to identify an unfamiliar species and that details such as stipules, flower stalk growth, hairs, glands on the leaves, flower stalk, sepals, flower structures and seed all play significant roles in species identification. Merely browsing through the CP Photo Finder isn't good enough as often times plants are mis-identified/labeled or don't show enough detail of the finer structures. Use the finder to narrow down likely suspects and then track down the published descriptions of the plants. If you can find a recent taxonomic key so much the better. You can find Saint Hilaire's book online - even though the diagnoses are in Latin (note Google translate chokes on many botanical Latin terms - those of you who are "fluent" in botanical Latin help us out by training Google translate with better translations). You can find many herbarium specimens online too.

    Speaking of flowers and seeds do is it known which of the species are self-incompatible? It would seem that almost all of the Villosa Complex that are already in cultivation are self-incompatible.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  5. #13

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    Hey sorry for the late reply!

    AFAIK no Brazilian sundews are self-incompatible, although I have heard many complain over the years that they do not get seed. Maybe it's a humidity thing? Try the Andreas Fleischmann strategy: cut the styles short and add pollen to the stumps. This way, the pollen grains need only grow short tubes to reach the ovules.

    Good luck!
    Fernando Rivadavia
    Last edited by Fernando Rivadavia; 12-27-2014 at 01:23 PM.

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