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Thread: Tuberous dilema......

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    Sgt Sarracenia SgtSarracenia's Avatar
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    Tuberous dilema......

    Hello all. I hope someone can sway me one way or the other. I am expecting both D peltata and D auriculata seeds sometime in the next week or so. I have had success with peltata tubers, but never tried any tuberous Drosera seeds. I live in Southern California and temps are still quite on the cold side and still raining about once a week. The temps and humidity will not generally get summer like until mid June. Could I plant the seeds when I get them, since those two species do not need to be heat stratified, giving them about three months to "try" and germinate or do I wait until Sept to try and sow them? I know that them being tuberous Sundews that either way I may not see anything for years, but from what I understand, these are two of the easier ones to germinate. Any input is greatly appreciated.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Contrary to popular belief, these species do prefer a heat stratification, and at least in the case of D. auriculata, it will go dormant when temperatures get too high, as it is a purely south Australian species. I would wait to sow the seeds in about mid-July, and start moistening the pot around late August.
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    Sgt Sarracenia SgtSarracenia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Contrary to popular belief, these species do prefer a heat stratification, and at least in the case of D. auriculata, it will go dormant when temperatures get too high, as it is a purely south Australian species. I would wait to sow the seeds in about mid-July, and start moistening the pot around late August.
    Thanks for the heads up about them needing heat stratification as well. Do they need the whole fire/smoke thing? I knew that they would go dormant, that was no surprise. I guess what I should have asked, is if it would hurt them to sow now and let them germinate whenever or if it would be a bad thing to sow them so close to warmer weather and if it would allow them enough time should they germinate to form a tuber and survive dormancy. I think you pretty much answered my question though. I should wait until the fall to sow them. The only additional question I have is why sow in July and moisten in August? It is generally still in the high 80's and sometimes still 90's through September here. I think the stigma of them being so difficult has me spooked. I just want to do it right. Thanks for your help and any words of wisdom is accepted graciously.
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    The heat stays around where I live sometimes into October, but that's just what I do to make sure they get about 2-3 months of heat. It't likely safe to sow them in August, possibly moistening them right away to make sure they are properly stratified, jsut make sure the soil isn't very wet, just barely damp to the touch. Cold temperatures starting in Sepetember-October will tell you when to get the pot very moist.
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    Sgt Sarracenia SgtSarracenia's Avatar
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    Ok, thats what I thought your reasoning was. To give them a few month of warm/hot weather. I will sow them in July, that would give them 2-3 months of heat. In a nutshell, at least with those two species, treat them like I do my peltata tubers then. Moist at best until constant low 70's and almost cold at night, then start to get them "wet"? Is that about right? I know that it can take quite a while for tuberous Sundews to germinate, but what have you experienced with these two species?

    I hope to get some of the other species of Tuberous Sundews also. Other than the two I am expecting, are there any others that are sown the same way? Are there species that absolutely require the smoke/fire stratifying?

    I have taken a huge interest in the Tuberous Sundews after seeing the ease at which my peltata tubers sprouted and have grown this season. I realised that they are not hard to keep as long as you understand their needs. Now I want an army of them. LOL

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    D. peltata in my experience sprouts relatively quickly under these conditions, the D. auriculata seeds I received once were not viable. As far as I know, none of the species need fire treatment like other sundews or Byblis, but on many scarifying the seeds definitely helps in germination. Small seeds can be gently rubbed between sandpaper to remove part of the seed coat, larger seeds can be pricked with a needle. Without this treatment, many of the other tuberous species may take up to 2-3 seasons to sprout. Any within the D. peltata complex, though, should sprout within 5-6 weeks after the hot stratification.
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    Sgt Sarracenia SgtSarracenia's Avatar
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    Are these seeds about the same size as most Drosera? Im just imagining myself rubbing seeds between sand paper. If they are the same size, please give me pointers. Its an act of God to not lose them to begin with, yet alone rubbing them between sandpaper. Sounds like fun though! I am looking forward to trying the other species when they become available. Thanks for all your help.
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    I haven't had to try the sandpaper with the smaller seed types (yes, about the same size as most Drosera), so I can't help with that just yet. The only ones I've done it on are D. ramellosa and D. stolonifera, where I just held the seeds between my fingers and rubbed sandpaper between them to pull off the outer seed coat.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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