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Thread: Drosera Leaves Turning Black From Tips to Base?

  1. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    Thanks! I'll try adjusting water levels tomorrow. I think most of the pots are pretty much pure peat, perhaps a bit of perlite, not much.
    Woah, that's kind of dense.

  2. #18
    Formerly known as Pineapple Nepenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by utricularia View Post
    When you put them in the sphagnum, do you take them out of the pots and then plant them in the sphagnum? I had read it as you were placing the potted plants in the sphagnum. If you are taking them out- I wonder if your soil is perhaps too dense. Of course- Api's suggestion is good. If they like the Sphagnum- why not pot them up in sphagnum?

    I think it depends on the particular species. Most of mine, I am a little more conservative on the water. The vast majority of my Droseras are either Australian or South African though (I do not have a single North American species Ironically). D. spatulata for example- dies a miserable death in my care. I have been told D. spatulata almost likes flooding.

    "My Nepenthes are receiving enough light as well as the Drosera in the Sphagnum cultures which are also under the shade cloth. If they weren't getting enough light, I wouldn't have even bought shade cloth. I have it because there is too much light."

    I am starting to wonder about light though- are they producing dew at least? When you say the species in the Sphagnum are getting enough light- are you comparing identical species in and out of the sphagnum culture? Same amount of light? If so, I would also consider the humidity levels. 60% RH seems fine to me but I would expect that the ones in the Sphagnum are at a slightly higher RH. A good test of this might be to put a potted drosera (assuming you are placing pot and all in the cultures) in a plastic bag and mount it in the culture as you normally would- see how it responds.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, I take them out of their pots and put them into Sphagnum. They are in a greenhouse in full sun for a couple hours a day, which is why I need shade cloth. The rest of the day it is very bright shade. There are capensis dying outside of the Sphagnum cultures and capensis thriving inside of the Sphagnum cultures. Same with spatulatas and other species as well. As I mentioned, there are many naturally occurring species in the Sphagnum as well.

    They are producing tons of dew... Even at they turn black at the tips and work toward the base of the leaf, they are covered in dew. Humidity definitely isn't the issue, but the ones in the Sphagnum cultures are probably getting slightly higher humidity, but since there is so much air flow due to the swamp cooler, I would think that as the dews get taller, they would lose the extra humidity since it is probably held no further than container side level.

    Quote Originally Posted by mylesG View Post
    then id go a bit below 1/4. pure peat can wick moisture very very easily
    Alright, I'll go really light on the water for a while and see how that does.

  3. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    Yes, I take them out of their pots and put them into Sphagnum.
    I'm becoming more convinced its your soil density.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    They are producing tons of dew... Even at they turn black at the tips and work toward the base of the leaf, they are covered in dew.
    So then light is probably not the issue- thats good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    Humidity definitely isn't the issue, but the ones in the Sphagnum cultures are probably getting slightly higher humidity, but since there is so much air flow due to the swamp cooler, I would think that as the dews get taller, they would lose the extra humidity since it is probably held no further than container side level.
    Huh?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pineapple View Post
    Alright, I'll go really light on the water for a while and see how that does.
    While you are at it- try this experiment. Take two of the same species. Transplant both at the same time (so we can factor out exhausted media- lets start with fresh soil)- put one in your usual soil mix (almost pure peat) and one in a much airier mix (like 50/50 peat/sand or live LFS or something). Personally, I think your dense soil could be a problem. Not sure if it is fair to completely blame it on soil density but you mentioned that you have a hard time keeping dews alive. Soil density could explain a lot of that. Roots need oxygen- hard to get that in pure peat.

  4. #20

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    By the way- do you have a picture?

  5. #21
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    If you never repot your plants the media breaks down in as little as 1 year depending on the quality of the media, water, watering practices and other environmental conditions. Drosera in particular show many of the same symptoms you describe beginning after the 2-3 year mark with old media. And yes they will eventually die.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #22
    The Most Uncreative Name in the History of Ever Plant Planter's Avatar
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    Yeah, repotting is a really good idea after a while. If you don't do it often enough (every one or two years) the soil can break down and your plant's roots can become crowded, although that's pretty uncommon for carnivorous plants...

  7. #23
    Sgt Sarracenia SgtSarracenia's Avatar
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    The soil quality could be one of the major factors affecting the die back of your dews, but I truly feel you should have a 50/50 mix. Peat : sand or perlite

    Drosera cannot all be treated the same though. D. intermedia for example like to grow in water logged media, while others not so much.

    The reason they are growing far better in the Sphagnum is because the roots are being aerated and not being suffocated by such a dense medium.

    Like I told the kids when I did the 6th grade presentation earlier this week, put water about 1/4 of the way up. So when you touch the top of the media it feels wet, but not like a sponge. Maybe you should rethink getting anymore Drosera until you get the problem solved. I would hate for you to continue killing plants unnecessarily.
    "Only when you live to learn, will you learn to live"
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  8. #24
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    D. aliciae - here's some of the weird things that can happen when the media is old and breaking down. Note the thin dead leaves around the strange structure:
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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