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Thread: for those who have received Drosera dilatatopetiolaris from me...

  1. #1
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    for those who have received Drosera dilatatopetiolaris from me...

    time to update your labels. conversing with a petiolaris buff, my plant has been identified Drosera petiolaris...
    apparently, D. dilatatopetiolaris has wider petioles, probably somewhere along the lines of fulva.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Maybe not. Only the inner leaves should be oblanceolate and this may not be obvious until the plant is flowering. I referred you to this document last year.

    Flora of the Darwin Region Volume 1 March 2011
    Droseraceae
    P.S. Short
    http://www.lrm.nt.gov.au/__data/asse...ROSERACEAE.pdf
    ------------------------

    D. dilatatopetiolaris
    K. Kondo
    Herb, rosulate, with a short underground stem which may divide and take root, the short stem enveloped in remnant leaf bases and their long, reddish-brown hairs. Leaves of the rosette poly-morphic, at the commencement of flowering the outer ones manifestly longer and usually obviously narrower than the inner leaves and often dead or dying; outer leaves with linear petioles to c. 70 mm long, 0.7–1 mm wide, the lamina circular or widely elliptic, 1.5–2 (5.5) mm wide; inner leaves linear-oblanceolate, 12–35 mm long, (0.8) 1.5–2 mm wide, the lamina circular, 2–3.5 mm wide; stipules 5–8 mm long. Flowers in 1–3 racemes, each raceme with (3) 7–15 flowers; racemes 8–20 cm long and somewhat brownish at anthesis, hairs on the scape commonly simple but branched hairs often present; pedicels 1.5–7 mm long, with a dense indumentum of dendritic hairs. Sepals obovate, 3–3.5 mm long, 1–2 mm wide, with a dense indumentum of dendritic hairs. Petals obovate, 4–7 mm long, 2.5–4 mm wide, white or shades of pink. Stamens 2.5–3 mm long; anthers yellow; filaments not extending above the anther. Styles 3 or 4 and each with lobes above the middle. Seeds ellipsoid. Flowering: mostly Oct.–Feb., also noted July & Aug.
    Originally described from a specimen from the Howard River estuary in the D.R. this taxon is common in the Top End and Lowrie (1998) also recorded it in northern W.A. It tends to favour sandy soils in low-lying, often inundated regions, such as sedgelands and Grevillea pteridifolia wood-land but has also been noted in low-lying areas in eucalypt woodland.
    The presence of differently shaped inner and outer leaves was not mentioned in the original description (Kondo 1984) of D. dilatatopetiolaris but appear to be present, albeit barely so, in plate 1A which accompanied the description. The same figure, enlarged, was also published by Kondo & Lavarack (1984, fig. 8) and a curling, longer and more narrow basal leaf is evident on each side of the rosette which is otherwise composed of shorter, broader leaves. Their presence is often clearly evident but in specimens in which flowering is well advanced the remnants of linear petioles at the base of the rosette are sometimes difficult to find or, assuming that all plants do indeed produce them, have been shed.
    Many non-flowering specimens held at DNA with only linear or near-linear petioles have been previously considered to belong to D. petiolaris. The observed leaf polymorphism suggests that most or all are specimens of D. dilatatopetiolaris.
    ------------------------

    See also the taxonomic key in same publication
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  3. #3
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    you could be right Warren, but in my case, i've never seen polymorphic leaves ever on my dilatatopetiolaris/petiolaris- but the fact that it has never flowered for me could also be the reason (sounds very caduca-like). That underlined sentence is most confusing to me--"non-flowering specimens only linear or near-linear petioles considered...D. petiolaris...observed leaf polymorphisim (how can it be polymorphic if it just stated that they've been observed to only have linear or near-linear petioles) suggests that most or all (of the non-flowering specimens?) are specimens of D. dilatatopetiolaris.

    is anyone else confused by these two statements?

    p.s. the ID was made by your "arch nemesis" Sean. the guy does have hundreds of petiolaris, so i *hope* that he knows what he's talking about....

    i also came to understanding that D. dilatatopetiolaris and D. petiolaris (per another australian botanist via flickr) that both species are not sympatric with each other, so it could be easier to id the disputed plants if one had their location data.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
    +picture thread

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