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Thread: adelae problem

  1. #9
    Decumbent Fanatic Jcal's Avatar
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    I agree with the two gentleman above. It looks like some kind of burn. Maybe adjusting to the new conditions.
    I do grow mine in open air and there as a fan blowing across them. The fan is for other plants but even with the low humidity and air movement they are doing just fine. Not as dewy as I like but fine non the less. One even decided put up a flower stalk. New conditions can throw them in funk. Are the close to the lights?


    I've never tried coir but my plants in peat mixes grow alittle slower. Lfs/perlite is the best mix I have found for them. I have switched most of my Adelae away from peat but I am still experimenting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theplantman View Post
    That is a crazy-awesome post.
    Wow - really agree on that!! Providing real-life experience with both plants in the wild & in cultivation is fantastic.

    Adelea, While I don't want to do a thread-hijack, do you have similar information on the other two sisters (prolifera & schizandra)? If so, I think it would be excellent to start another thread to share this level of information.
    All the best,
    Ron
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    (with Pics)

  3. #11
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Sticky time! And thank you for your conservation/restoration efforts.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  4. #12
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DragonsEye View Post
    Recently, I noticed that the leaves of my D. adelae are starting to look ... really crappy. Not sure if this is mite damage (though no webbing to be seen nor can I see any of the little vermin -- but considering how small they are that probably isn't surprising) or the result of some other issue. Any ideas ... as well as how best to treat? (The D. binate that is literally right next to them is just fine.)
    My thoughts from looking at the close-up would be thrips or chemical burn. Thrips are tiny and can spend part of their life-cycle in the tissue of the leaves. Have you sprayed anything near the plants? Insecticide, fungicide, fertilizers, or air-freshener - anything?
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    My thoughts from looking at the close-up would be thrips or chemical burn. Thrips are tiny and can spend part of their life-cycle in the tissue of the leaves. Have you sprayed anything near the plants? Insecticide, fungicide, fertilizers, or air-freshener - anything?
    was going to say the same thing. I have seen similar when the plants get big changes in environment . Like when i move them from T-12 lights to outside partial shade and found partial shade now enough for them in my conditions. But yeah looks like mites. thrips would be some black spotting . many of them leave a black tar like spotting which is their poop...

  6. #14
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    My thoughts from looking at the close-up would be thrips or chemical burn. Thrips are tiny and can spend part of their life-cycle in the tissue of the leaves. Have you sprayed anything near the plants? Insecticide, fungicide, fertilizers, or air-freshener - anything?
    Nope, no chemical sprays. Because most of my plants are indoors with me for most if not all of the year, I am always reluctant to use any type of pesticide/chemical as I will be constantly exposed to it as well. With regards to fertilizer, I tend to be very forgetful with regards to fertilizing any of my plants. Most of my orchids had gone 3yrs before finally receiving some fertilizer this past summer. The cps were not exposed to any of the fertilizer. Only watered with RO water.

    It is definitely cooler where they are now then where they were over the summer. Summertime they were out on the balcony (unobstructed SE exposure) that gets quite hot. They were shaded during the worst of the midday sun by plants above them on the plantstand. Currently they are sitting where I took the photos -- on the floor by the sliding glass doors. (It is the best lit unoccupied area.) Apt temps are around 75F by day and around 68-69F at night. Imagine it might be a couple degrees cooler on the floor by the glass doors but not much more than that.

    Leaves are still slightly dewy, but nowhere near as dewy as they were outside over the summer.

    Assuming thrips or mites are the culprits, suggested course of treatment?


    Thanks for the info, Adelea!




    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



  7. #15
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    You'd have to ID which pest as the treatment would be different for mites. If it is thrips Spinosad works great - biological and somewhat specific to which families and genus it will work on. Shouldn't hurt the plants. D. adelae are somewhat sensitive to chemicals and unfortunately most miticides are rather strong.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #16
    theplantman's Avatar
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    Alright. I have enough time to finally take a crack at this. Keep in mind my judgment is only subjective.

    I am going to throw in a strong possibility that it may be a simple nutrient deficiency, probably potassium combined with nitrogen. Potassium is known for its ability to cause spotting as well as marginal burn; nitrogen causes chlorosis beginning on the lower foliage. I think that the pattern appears to be mostly regular on the leaves, and this to me suggests the problem is not related to a pest. Pests simply don't care where they feed and the resulting patterns are usually irregular.

    Additionally, it appears that the lower leaves have a different pattern than the younger growth, and this is also often indicative of several nutritional problems. I felt like similar issues were evident in that african violet I got from you, and it may very well be that your regimen is a little spartan. I don't mean any offense by this, as I'm sure you understand, and I am completely motivated by really wanting your plant to live. I have tried 1/8 strength (1/8 tsp per gal) liquid feeding on the D. adelae I got from you and the plant was not negatively affected at all. I repeat, despite other info, I have given low-strength feed to D. adelae and not caused any burn nor any consequences whatsoever at this rate. I would recommend starting a course of treatment by ruling out any possibility that this could be related to nutrition. It may be that the coir is beginning to decay and the microbial demand for nutrition is starving your adelae.

    I do not think it is thrips personally. Their damage looks like tiny striations (lines) because their feeding is kind of like a miniature bulldozer. They scrape up tissue in a line and then eat it. I have never seen thrip damage that looks like yellow spots. Moreover, I rarely see thrip damage that leaves the leaf shape unaffected. Since they prey mainly on new tissue that is still growing, the tissue continues to grow and ultimately develops malformed. For this reason it's also weird that you have older leaves with damage--it just isn't their preferred hunting ground.

    Thrips are known vectors for many diseases and viruses but I see this possibility as unlikely unless an affected plant nearby was bitten first. If I have a plant with thrip damage, I am almost always able to find thrips if I look hard enough. Since you have a wide variety of other plants, take a good, long look at every single flower you have for thrips. They prefer pollen and flower parts because they are soft. The best strategy is to flick the flowers or leaves, because it causes them to move around. If you see any, cutting every flower off is the best preventative action while you curtail the outbreak. If this is a problem you've noticed over multiple weeks, I expect you would have seen them by now. Thrips love yellow and blue sticky traps also and this is an easy way to detect but not defeat them.

    If you do find thrips (young are reddish and adults are black and are roughly the size of little chunks of pencil lead) you can fight them with neonicotinoids (Safari is the best thing I have tried in this category), organophosphates (orthene), and spinosad. Spinosad seems less effective or shorter-lived in its effects than the others; it also must be shaken before mixing to agitate the ingredients. I greatly prefer something with a systemic mode of action that gets into the pollen.

    I also doubt it's mites because you would be able to find them on the underside of the leaf. The amount of damage you have is something I could only foresee getting when my infestations are beyond severe, and usually the webbing occurs at that same time. Also, damage is rarely done to the top of the leaves. The spots that mites leave are not as big as what I'm seeing in the photo.

    So, in conclusion, I think first you should get it fed at 1/8 tsp/gal strength once a week (for the first time, soak the entire pot and rootball in it for a couple minutes), see what that does, and start scouting meticulously for any kinds of pests. If you find no little bugs, we can then assume your cause is cultural in some way (light, humidity, nutrition) or pathological (diseases). I also second the notion to dome or cover the plant. It will both act as a quarantine barrier and the humidity will help it out in a variety of ways. Maybe even take one of the plantlets out and repot it into the LFS/perlite mix that several have suggested. Since you're in MI, the sun shouldn't be able to fry your adelae for quite some time. This week I accidentally left my hobby greenhouse sealed on a sunny day with the heater on, and the temps only got up to 85F--hardly anything to worry about. And that's in Georgia.
    Last edited by theplantman; 12-18-2013 at 02:30 PM.

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