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  1. #81
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    I've had 2 of the hookeri "orange/red" flower for me, this first already resulting in seeds and the latter showing pink in its flowers
    D. hookeri "Orange/red" Conara, TS by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. hookeri "Orange/red" Conara, TS by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. hookeri "Orange/red" Conara, TS by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Also, the "Ivan's 3-Way" spatulata began flowering, and while I haven't caught open flowers, I found buds of both pure white and deep pink flowered forms
    D. spatulata "Ivan's 3-way" pink and white buds by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    stolonifera's last stand
    D. stolonifera by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. auriculata "typical" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. auriculata "typical" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Still waiting....
    D.cistiflora "purple flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Finally also got something other than the peltata complex to climb...
    D. menziesii menziesii by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. auriculata "Clare Valley, S. Au" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata "white flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. cistiflora unknown form by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Already harvested the year's first seeds from these guys too
    D. trinervia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. aliciae by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. capensis "wide leaf" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. aliciae x natalensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. citrina citrina by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    My one and only remaining paleacea
    D. paleacea trichocaulis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. scorpioides "Pink Flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. regia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. capensis "red" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    1st flowers on their way from this cross
    D. aliciae x sp. Lantau Island by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. madagascariensis x affinis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. brevifolia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. tokaiensis x spatulata 'Tamlin' by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata 'Tamlin' x tokaiensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    These guys still go through that irritating "no growth point" phase, but they look great otherwise
    D. affinis x spatulata "white flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. felix by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. sp. Lantau Island x brevifolia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Which flower do you like best?
    D. spatulata 'Tamlin' x sp. Lantau Island by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata 'Tamlin' x sp. Lantau Island by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata 'Tamlin' x "white flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. sp. Lantau Island x capensis "typical" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. sp. Lantau Island x capensis 'Albino' by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. tokaiensis x spatulata "white flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata "white flower" x tokaiensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Shortly after this photo these guys were put into fresh, algae-free soil. They have since exploded in growth
    D. neocaledonica by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. 'Tom Turpin' by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. prolifera by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata "Fraser Island" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Finally other variants of this cross growing out, will be cool to compare them
    D. spatulata "Royal Natl. Pk. Sydney" x anglica "Oregon" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. graomogolensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    These guys are growing out well, and my other filiformis forms are starting to wake up now. Sadly however, I appear to have lost ALL of my tracyi to a freeze in the fridge
    D. filiformis "FL All Red" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. madagascariensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. madagascariensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. spatulata 'Tamlin' x "Royal National Park, Sydney" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. sessilifolia finally big enough to recognize
    D. sessilifolia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    And last of all, my pot of "sticky lettuce"
    D. schizandra by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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  2. #82
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    I like the D. sp. "Lantau Island" x capensis typical. I'll be interested in seeing what full-sized plants of that cross look like. Congrats on the D. cistiflora - I've yet to bring that species to blooming successfully.
    - Mark

  3. #83
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    The Lantau x capensis are full sized and flowering, have been for a while. Though, I assume they can get larger since they are all potted together.
    And I haven't seen any cistiflora flowers either, so not quite a full success yet...
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  4. #84
    David F's Avatar
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    Dear Carlton, how do you label the delicate drosera flowers?

    I'm interested in both large capensis, and burmanii variety crossing projects, and I was wondering what your system of keeping track of it all is.
    Also, do you think crossing burmanii with other burmanii would result in interesting plants?

    Lastly, thank you for the photos of your hybrids, it's awesome and I visit this thread often.
    Last edited by David F; 04-10-2015 at 11:07 PM.

  5. #85
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David F View Post
    Dear Carlton, how do you label the delicate drosera flowers?

    I'm interested in both large capensis, and burmanii variety crossing projects, and I was wondering what your system of keeping track of it all is.
    Also, do you think crossing burmanii with other burmanii would result in interesting plants?

    Lastly, thank you for the photos of your hybrids, it's awesome and I visit this thread often.
    For hybridization they're labeled with various color threads, each species a different color. The crossed flower is tied with the thread of the species it was pollinated with, and vice versa if I go both directions.
    And as far as burmannii: I have seeds right now I'm waiting to sprout of a green plant with pink flowers crossed with the white flowered, red colored "Humpty Doo" locality. And, really the only plants you can cross burmannii with anyway are other burmannii and sessilifolia.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  6. #86
    David F's Avatar
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    I'm going to be trying a few giant "Hanns" locations X "Humpty Doo".

    Keep us updated on the burmanii, my favorite sundew .

  7. #87
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    D. aliciae x sp. Lantau Island by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. auriculata typical by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. regia is finally earning its name. Leaves are now exceeding a foot in length
    D. regia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. regia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. regia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. regia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. auriculata typical by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. auriculata Clare Valley, S Au by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Capensis threw off a funky leaf
    D. capensis "wide leaf" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. hookeri "Orange/red" Conara, TS by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. capensis "red leaf" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. brevifolia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. affinis x spatulata "white flower" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. tokaiensis x spatulata "Fraser Island" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. neocaledonica by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. natalensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. ultramafica x spatulata by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. tomentosa by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    These two will have the first threadleaf flowers this year. That is, if they stick around...
    D. 'Dreamsicle' by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. x californica "typical" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. graomogolensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. graomogolensis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. affinis by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    The "red" in the center of this batch has reached the tallest I've ever seen this form
    D. filiformis "FL All Red" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. filiformis "FL All Red" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. anglica Alakai Swamp, HI x spatulata (white flower x 'Tamlin&#x27 by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. burmanii 'Pilliga Red' by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    The three sisters
    D. adelae by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. prolifera by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. schizandra by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. intermedia Easton, MA by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. filiformis "typical" by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    D. rotundifolia by hawken.carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  8. #88
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    Great-looking 'dews! That's a very nice regia.
    - Mark

  9. #89
    NECPS Editor Radagast's Avatar
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    Great pics. Love the graomogolensis. I also enjoy looking at all the different hybrids you make. Quick question - When you sow seeds on your chosen media, do you just sprinkle them on as if you're adding a pinch of salt to a recipe, or do you try to space them out a bit more to give the seedlings room to grow without competition being too close?

  10. #90
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Seeds are sprinkled across the pot, and I never use the whole batch (however many it may be). If it's a small number of seeds, I purposely spread them out. If a large number, relatively evenly scattering.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

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