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Thread: All Things Petiolaris

  1. #25
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stasisgate View Post
    Those are some beautiful petiolaris Droseras you have there. Is that D. falconeri?

    I've just recently acquired some paradoxa, ordensis and broomensis seeds. Looking forward to them germinating. They should be easy to maintain here in Trinidad but time will tell.
    Yes, it is D. falconeri. The other plants are D. paradoxa, D. dilatato-petiolaris, D. lanata and D. ordensis assuming the last ones survive having been divided.

    That's a nice score on those seeds. 'Sounds like your climate should be great for them. I would like to hear how they do.

    On your avatar - are those kiwi fruit? Whatever they are - impressive plants!
    - Mark

  2. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemax View Post
    Yes, it is D. falconeri. The other plants are D. paradoxa, D. dilatato-petiolaris, D. lanata and D. ordensis assuming the last ones survive having been divided.

    That's a nice score on those seeds. 'Sounds like your climate should be great for them. I would like to hear how they do.

    On your avatar - are those kiwi fruit? Whatever they are - impressive plants!
    Beautiful falconeri... been trying to get my hands on some of those seeds but no luck thus far.

    Those aren't kiwi that's Coccoloba uvifera... we call them "seagrapes" down here and they're one of my fav fruits. You usually find them growing near the coast mostly by the sea (hence the name )The green fruits turn dark red when ripe, but they don't ripe all at once, and are salty-sweet... that's why I love them so much... timing them is not easy and at most I only get a handful if I'm lucky.

    I'll be sure to update you on the plants when they germinate!
    Weeds are flowers too, once you get to know them - A.A. Milne

    I think I'm addicted

  3. #27
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stasisgate View Post
    Beautiful falconeri... been trying to get my hands on some of those seeds but no luck thus far.
    Having seed would perhaps put you ahead just a bit. I wonder if any and all D. falconeri that one is likely to see in this country are not the same clone from AG3? The same for some of the other petiolaris species. I really like the idea of having seed-grown plants so there is a greater chance for genetic diversity, and the possibility of producing single-species seed.
    - Mark

  4. #28
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    Wonderful Petiolaris E-Book

    Perhaps many have seen this book, produced by the AIPC in Italy, but if you love petiolaris sundews and you haven't it is certainly worth a look. If it were fine-bound in hard-copy it would make an excellent coffee table book. But it's not just about the wonderful photographs. It has hard to find information of every sort including a cultivation section and descriptions and photos of individual species. The information about how to get a copy is here: http://www.aipcnet.it/aipcjoomla/ind...al-issues.html For us english speaking types it comes in a nicely translated english version.

    For $10 they will send you a cd copy (in PDF format) or you can ask them to just email the file to you. And the money goes to support a very worthy CP preservation project. 'One of the best things I have seen on the subject.
    - Mark

  5. #29
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    The Species

    It might be useful to spell out the established species of the petiolaris complex as they now stand. If anyone has updates or knows of any I've left out please feel free to add to this list.

    As I understand it the species are:

    Drosera banksii, D. brevicornis, D. broomensis

    D. caduca, D. darwinensis, D. derbyensis

    D. dilatato-petiolaris, D. falconeri, D. fulva

    D. kenneallyi, D. lanata, D. ordensis

    D. paradoxa, D. petiolaris


    There are also the plants with the aff. prefix on their names, such as D. aff. paradoxa. Aff. is short for affinis, which essentially means this plant is like D. paradoxa. Whether these are new species, new forms or subspecies, or hybrids remains unestablished. While the current taxonomy seems pretty messy it has improved in recent times and several aff. plants have been named as newer species. We can hope that someone with the necessary training and abilities will soon work to further clarify the others with the aff. tag.



    D. paradoxa



    D. falconeri
    - Mark

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemax View Post
    What it all comes down to for me is the petiolaris sundews need all the regular things sundews need: relatively high light levels, lots of water and fairly standard Drosera soil. But what they need besides is humidity in the 70%+ levels and temperatures that never go below the 70's F., unless you are intentionally inducing dormancy. How you produce these conditions can vary a lot. In truly tropical climates they can be grown out of doors.
    Hey, what is the source of your humidity? is it just a tray and your terrarium keeps all the humidity in? because i don't have a terrarium but in the setup I'm experimenting in the humidity is right at 40% humidity when it is 97 degrees F and at night the humidity is 80/90% when the temps are in the low 70's. do you guys think this will work? thanks for the help!

    PS. I don't have any plants yet I'm experimenting before i get any. And any newbie tips you can give on growing petiolaris complex sundews would be much appreciated!
    Last edited by Robster_24; 03-29-2014 at 07:49 PM.

  7. #31
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
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    yes. that will work. very well as a matter of fact. dont be afraid to bump up the max temps either. they can take it up to 120-125F in the wild.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
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  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by amphirion View Post
    yes. that will work. very well as a matter of fact. dont be afraid to bump up the max temps either. they can take it up to 120-125F in the wild.
    is it ok if the temps regularly get into the low 60s at night as long as the daytime temps get in the 90s?

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