User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Equal to Drosera capensis?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    USA, GA
    Posts
    801
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Equal to Drosera capensis?

    What other Sundew are equally as easy (or just a tad more difficult) to grow?

  2. #2
    theplantman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Posts
    973
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D. nidiformis, binata, and spatulata are right up there with capensis: easiest I've ever grown. D. aliciae seems more sensitive to our GA heat and it can get rot prone in summer, but still is considered pretty easy. All will grow on a windowsill, but in GA you've got to protect them from heat (especially heat at the root zone--the peat can cook at well over 100 degrees, even on a window!!) from June to August. When I first started growing plants I used white plastic yogurt cups on my windowsill to reflect the heat, and I would even tape layers of white paper over every single pot. Labor-intensive, but that single windowsill was all the space I had for quite some time and I still managed to have a killer Drosera collection. I would recommend growing outside from April to June. In June temps start cooking my Drosera and I move them to partially sunny areas where they avoid direct noon-day sun. Then in September they get full sun again, and finally they move inside my greenhouse (or windowsills) from late October to March/April.

    Easy annuals: D. burmannii, indica, Byblis liniflora (note: not a Drosera)

    This is going to be my first year trying tuberous and pygmy sundews outside in GA. The length and heat and relatively high rainfall of summer are all very difficult to get Australian plants through and I only recommend them if you are insane like me. West Coast people are so lucky to not have every fungus and bacteria in the world attack their stuff during the growing season. Not to mention the heat here!! I have worked with researchers from Zimbabwe, and Egypt, and India, and southeast Asia--they have all told me Georgia is hotter, stickier, and more muggy than any of these places! Then again, most of our water is GA is pure and completely fine for CPs and we have almost unlimited access to fresh water for our plants.

    Where are you in GA?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Hacienda Heights, CA USA
    Posts
    1,374
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theplantman View Post
    This is going to be my first year trying tuberous and pygmy sundews outside in GA. The length and heat and relatively high rainfall of summer are all very difficult to get Australian plants through and I only recommend them if you are insane like me. West Coast people are so lucky to not have every fungus and bacteria in the world attack their stuff during the growing season. Not to mention the heat here!! I have worked with researchers from Zimbabwe, and Egypt, and India, and southeast Asia--they have all told me Georgia is hotter, stickier, and more muggy than any of these places! Then again, most of our water is GA is pure and completely fine for CPs and we have almost unlimited access to fresh water for our plants.

    Where are you in GA?
    Nominally, tuberous and some pygmy sundews would be dormant in the summer, so they would probably do better indoors, since they wouldn't need feeding or sunlight. If you were to grow tuberous sundews outside year round, I would recommend keeping them out of the sun and rain during the summer, because the tubers can dry out easily under the hot sun and if kept too wet they will rot.

    Generally, the subtropical South African species (except Drosera regia) are pretty easy to grow. I would add Drosera madagascariensis, venusta, and tokaiensis.

  4. #4
    Decumbent Fanatic Jcal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Zone 7a
    Posts
    1,243
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Easy plants that I have grown have been D. spatulata, D. venusta, D. Binata. Binata and capes I have grown outside year round with my sarracenia. I've let the pots freeze and everything and they always come back from the roots. venusta is a beautiful plant that flowered so many times this year that I eventually got tired of its flower stalks ( that are huge! A few feet huge) and started cutting them off.

  5. #5
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D. tokaiensis is extremely easy, as is spatulata and most binata types.

  6. #6
    mcantrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Twin Falls, ID, USA
    Posts
    497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D. Spatulata is turning out to be absurdly easy to grow for me. As if, if not easier than D. Capensis. D. Dichtotoma 'Giant', which is related somehow to D. Binata(?), is pretty easy to grow.

    Spatulata seems to self very easily, meaning it makes it's own seed without needing any help. Capensis does as well. Dichotoma 'Giant' has this odd property where if you cut a leaf off you don't just get 1-5 smaller plants, you get like... 50.




  7. #7
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    LOL! D. binata:





  8. #8
    biologyboy98's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Marietta, Georgia
    Posts
    73
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have found the D. madagascariensis quite easy to grow, tough as nails, and spreads itself through seed very readily.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •