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Thread: Glanduligera hybrids

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    Glanduligera hybrids

    Has anyone tried to hybridize Glanduligera with some hardy Drosera? Say Filiformis or Filiformis x Intermedia?

    I'm in Zone 7, but would like to put some of these outside. If I can get the trapping behavior worked into a strong hybrid, that'll do nicely.

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    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
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    That's an interesting idea, but I don't know if it will work or not. D. glanduligera is a rare and difficult winter growing annual. D. filiformis is it's polar opposite in almost every aspect. Not a lot of Drosera can hybridize freely like Sarracenia and Nepenthes, especially the ones that are so different.

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    Ah, so it'll be unlikely to pollinate; and, if it does, the seeds would likely be sterile.

    Assume that I can get them to pollinate. How many seeds would I get? What's the germination time?

    With genetic modification, you usually put a particular gene on a cassette (a DNA ring in certain bacteria) and use that to inject the gene into some plant material, which you clone; there's about a 1 in 100,000 chance of successful injection, and it may take 100 or so trials to get something useful. Then you have to breed the modified plant and select for improvements in the injected trait.

    With hybridization, it's similar: plants that produce hundreds or thousands of seeds or spores may have very few germinate successfully; from these few, you may get boring results (i.e. a gene combination strikingly similar to one or the other parent, rather than a good hybrid). It's a matter of controlled pollination, followed by sewing everything and seeing if you get anything good. If I get 1000 seeds out and 2 sprout, I'm on the right track.

    Obviously, foxes can't breed with rabbits; that's always a possible outcome. On the other hand, ***** can breed with horses, and have produced fertile mules.
    Last edited by bluefoxicy; 07-26-2014 at 10:25 AM.

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    w03's Avatar
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    D. glanduligera is in its own subgenus, Coelophylla, and as Bio pointed out, many Drosera do not hybridize freely. If there was a hybrid made using D. glanduligera, I would suspect it would be with closely related species, such as pygmy sundews.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
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    Brittnacher reports 22 chromosomes in glanduligera, 20 in filiformis, different ploidies, the two are very distantly related and glanduligera is an annual, I think the odds are against it but there's only one way to find out for sure.
    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cp/...hromosomes.php

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewilder View Post
    Brittnacher reports 22 chromosomes in glanduligera, 20 in filiformis, different ploidies, the two are very distantly related and glanduligera is an annual, I think the odds are against it but there's only one way to find out for sure.
    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cp/...hromosomes.php
    Nope, that's pretty much it. Wrong number of chromosomes, won't match up. Can't do it.

    Thanks all.

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