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Thread: Spatulata Variety Identity

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    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Spatulata Variety Identity

    So my spatulata is finally about to flower, with pink petals (just slightly lighter than magenta). I don't know what variety I have, but it doesn't seem like many varieties have pink flowers, so given that and the fact that the leaves stay bright green despite other drosera in the same conditions turning deep red, is it possible to determine what variety it is?
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Pictures are going to be needed, and considering D. tokaiensis and x tokaiensis are often confused with spatulata varieties (as spatulata is the parent of the non-polyploid hybrid), and many forms of those are pink flowered, little else will really help determine. There are in fact a number of pink flowered spatulata (Sydney, Beenak, var. gympiensis, certain Japanese forms).
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    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Pictures are going to be needed, and considering D. tokaiensis and x tokaiensis are often confused with spatulata varieties (as spatulata is the parent of the non-polyploid hybrid), and many forms of those are pink flowered, little else will really help determine. There are in fact a number of pink flowered spatulata (Sydney, Beenak, var. gympiensis, certain Japanese forms).
    I'll take a picture when the flower actually opens. And how many of those varieties stay green?
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    That can depend on the plant, and the light levels. Some forms don't turn red until they're in full sun. This includes most D. x/ tokaiensis forms, and a number of spatulata varieties. A lot of them stay green, but appear very red when the tentacles turn scarlet in good light.
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    Last edited by PsychoSarah; 09-14-2014 at 04:24 PM.
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    If they produce seeds, you have D. tokaiensis. If the flowers are sterile, it's D. x tokaiensis
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    If they produce seeds, you have D. tokaiensis. If the flowers are sterile, it's D. x tokaiensis
    I am kind of confused, is D. tokaiensis a hybrid itself as well or is it a spatulata variety? Sources were mixed on that. And if it is one of those, why is mine so green in conditions that make my other pigmented drosera red?
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    D. x tokaiensis is a hybrid between D. spatulata and D. rotundifolia, of which in the wild a number of populations have spontaneously gone polyploid and become fertile, producing a new fertile species D. tokaiensis, much like how D. anglica and D. x anglica are in North America.
    As for the color, D. tokaiensis generally tends to stay green, but if it's getting enough light the tentacles should be bright red and the leaves may be red edged. If your pictures show the light levels they're getting I would find a way to increase it though.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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