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Thread: Drosera murfetii

  1. #17
    LuluMegan's Avatar
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    A friend of mine grows D. Arcturi successfully in New Zealand. He has them set up in a bog where he has a cold water pump system running through it.

    Here are some pictures of some of his, I messaged him with a link to this thread, maybe he'll have some good input




  2. #18
    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
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    Nice. Thank you for sharing! More information from your friend about care of these guys would be much appreciated.

  3. #19
    BANNED
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    Looks great!

  4. #20
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    @Dexenthes, Cthulhu138 and mato - Thanks for the comments on my plant, guys.

    @LuluMegan - Thank you for jumping in with the photos. I notice that the second one shows a plant with non-carnivorous leaves. I am still trying to get my head wrapped around what the difference between D. arcturi and D. murfetii is. Any comments from your friend would be very welcome.

    @DJ57 - Very nice! This is certainly useful information. I now have some leaf cuttings in water and lfs and I'm looking for strikes!
    - Mark

  5. #21
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    Hey all; Megan's friend here.

    I grew up on and around Mt Ruapehu, home of many alpine species of Arcturi, Spatulata, some Binata and illegally introduced Pinguicula. I'm currently in the process of writing up some information on the true environment these plants grow in, as it's something I've studied for long before I got into CPs. This information that follows is about Alpine Arcturi.

    I can't really comment on the Australian species of Arcturi or Murfetii, having never visited where they come from. The distinctions between the two are so blurred to me, in the same way that distinctions between D. Peltata and D. Auriculata are blurred to many, and in the same way there are no distinctions between D. Spatulata forms, even though they have varying sizes, flowers and environments. I do wonder if these people are trying to get their names in a paper by just bombarding us with numbers and nonsensical graphs; I digress.

    To cut it short, alpine Arcturis don't spend 3 months of the year under snow, they are almost always in hot sun with cold roots and cold ambient temperature. Putting them in a fridge, freezer or block of ice will just make them rot. From experience they don't like to be indoors or in warm water, I've lost many to that mistake. They certainly do curl backwards and send out non-carnivorous leaves, interesting to see success in leaf cuttings, not something I've tried yet! They love the sun and lots of food. Both are necessary if you want gorgeous healthy plants, but you have to keep the roots cool, the ambient temperature cool, and the plant nice and snug from hot sun, that's the golden, but very tricky, rule!

    It's my birthday today so I'm off to find more plants for my collection, but I'll let y'all know when I've finished the much longer version of this

  6. #22
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    Thank you for the information, bluemutiny. This is more useful cultural info for D. arcturi, at least the alpine forms, than I have heard up until now.

    Looking forward to anything new you will have to add. And happy birthday!
    Last edited by bluemax; 03-06-2015 at 06:17 PM.
    - Mark

  7. #23
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Well a belated Happy Birthday! If we had this information years ago perhaps the plants I had may still be alive. Seems like I did everything wrong. Sometimes you just have to make guesses based on whatever scant (and erroneous) information that is available at the time.

    There was another grower from New Zealand who was attempting to grow D. arcturi and was able to visit some of the growing sites but she stopped posting.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #24
    bluemutiny's Avatar
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    Thanks for the happy birthdays!

    I've just been fluffing around in my alpine bog and decided it was about time to remove the Arcturi seed pods. I keep it very sheltered so that the wind and rain can't damage the plants, only giving it a light shower occasionally to wash away old bugs/dirt on the dew.

    I've probably got about 1000 seeds in a bag and I'm now doing a sowing test, some directly on live sphagnum next to the cold-water outlet, some in the current location the Arcturus are growing (middle of the bog, not as cold), and some in the fridge with live sphagnum and a small layer of peat. I'm not counting the seeds sowed as I'm not interested in germination rate at this point and they're just too small for me to bother with.

    The reason for this test is to find out the true and correct way of getting the Alpine variety to germinate and how long it takes. I've read too much online about how they need to be kept at or below freezing to germinate and I don't believe that's a reasonable expectation given the environments they come from; that and I've had about 15-20 seedlings pop up over our hot summer in the bog, no stratification at all.

    I found even the NZCPS website says that they spend several months under snow each year. There is a possibility of this in the South Island, but I strongly believe it is an exception to the new rule I've decided on

    Photo is but a tiny selection of seeds from one of the pods.





    Last edited by bluemutiny; 03-23-2015 at 05:35 PM.

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