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Thread: Sundew identification

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    Brolloks's Avatar
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    Sundew identification

    Hi everyone

    I had a little sundew pop up in my one pot, at first I thought it was D. capensis as the specific pot in question has got D. capensis poping up everywhere, but as the plant got a bit older it started looking like something else. I am not 100% sure what though.

    Here is a photo, the plant is still very small so I don't think correct identification is possible yet.

    Am I correct when saying this does not look like D. capensis?


    This is a D. capensis
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-14-2014 at 12:27 AM. Reason: Nomenclature

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    w03's Avatar
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    You're right, that definitely isn't D. capensis. Looks more like D. natalensis or D. venusta to me.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I am assuming you are referring to the small rosette between the D. capensis leaf and the D. burmannii plant, in your first pic.

    If that is the plant in question. I would definitely say that it is probably not a D. capensis. Which species of rosette forming Drosera, it is, for me, would need to have it mature and produce flowers. It is easiest to correctly identify species when you have sufficient information (including a flower).
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Sashoke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by w03 View Post
    You're right, that definitely isn't D. capensis. Looks more like D. natalensis or D. venusta to me.
    All the rosetted Sundews look the same to me, I have no idea how you can tell them apart

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Sashoke, I have heard that same statement from many people, over the years and decades that I've been involved with these and other plants. It is definitely interesting to know that there can even be such subtle differences between we humans, as there are between these different plant species.

    I think that most of us can develop an "eye" for this type of thing. But I have met some, that may not even be able to do that.

    Saying all that, there are often subtle differences in Drosera leaves, even among their very young seedlings. Drosera binata seedlings initially form a basic Drosera shape, but soon begin forming branching leaves, while Drosera capensis, does the same, but then forms more and more elongated leaves. Though, for me, Drosera burmannii, Drosera sessilifolia, and Drosera glanduligera, are remarkably similar in appearance, for rosette forming Drosera.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    When I started growing sundews the rosetted species mostly looked the same to me, also. But after a bit of association you start to see differences between species like the striations on D. slackii petioles or the gradual elongation of the leaves and coverage of tentacles in D. aliciae. On the other hand, I still can't definitely tell the difference between D. natalensis and D. spatulata though I've grown both for years!
    - Mark

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    Brolloks's Avatar
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    I have a few D. venusta plantlets which I propagated from leaf cuttings, but they seem different from the rosette in my first photo. Unless I am mistaken?

    D. venusta propagates super easy from leaf cuttings.. wow
    Here is a photo of two of my D. venusta plantlets.


    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-14-2014 at 05:22 PM. Reason: Nomenclature

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    D. venusta is readily identified by looking at the plant in profile and noting the 30 and 60 leaf growth pattern that Debbert documents in his description and drawings of this species.

    Photographs from directly overhead are misleading because the medium is only two dimensional. Your average "ID this Sundew" photos alos typically lack the fine details such as stipules and trichomes on both sides of the leaves which help in identifying a species.

    No doubt someone will suggest D. tokaiensis.

    I say chalk it up to D. rotundastickya or D. spatuhaha for the time being.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 11-14-2014 at 03:33 PM.
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