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Thread: Tuberous Drosera

  1. #17
    Decumbent Fanatic Jcal's Avatar
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    Johnny,
    Would this guideline work equally well with U. menziesii? I have high hopes to get this plant soon.

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jcal View Post
    Johnny,
    Would this guideline work equally well with U. menziesii? I have high hopes to get this plant soon.
    For the most part, yes. I have found though that U.menziesii does best with a somewhat damp summer dormancy. In years past I've treated it exactly like the tuberous Drosera, giving it a dry dormancy and I've lost about half my tubers every time. This last summer I left the pots sitting in very shallow water, about 1/4 of an inch........just enough to keep the media slighly damp. I dug them up about 3 weeks ago and they all look great this year.....hopefully I'll see some flowers soon.

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    I secured a D. gigantea tuber and am slowly coaxing it into sprouting. Could you elaborate on the difficulties you've experienced with this species? Also, I've read that gigantea pops out a bit later than hookeri--also true?

    For my outdoor dormancy, I took the pots from their trays and lightly top-watered perhaps once a week. I slipped another pot around the pot for insulation from the heat. Left em in full sun. All the tubers sprouted, too!

    Again, I understand that D. hookeri doesn't have the hardest learning curve. But still, in my climate it was extremely encouraging to see little shoots popping up this fall!!

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    D.gigantea has always been the last species to wake up for me. It's also the only species I've grown where the tubers and plants get smaller than the previous year no matter how much I feed them. I've kept them exactly the same way as all the others and there's something about the conditions it doesn't like but, I think I've got it figured out (in theory anyway). This species is a bit different than most other species in a few different aspects though, most notably....

    A. D.gigantea grows on the margins of often permanent to semi permanent swamps and other bodies of water.
    B. It grows deeper than any other species, often right down to the water table.
    C. This species does not produce a papery covering on the dormant tuber to protect it from dessication.

    Given all this information, I suspect that D.gigantea actually prefers a slightly damp dormancy. I'm getting a half dozen or so this year to try different things on so I can really nail down it's cultivation. I'll post my findings in this thread as well as my photo thread.

    D.hookeri is indeed among the easiest species to grow. It doesn't even always go dormant in more tropical conditions if kept moist all year. Perfect starter species.

  5. #21
    theplantman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    D.gigantea has always been the last species to wake up for me. It's also the only species I've grown where the tubers and plants get smaller than the previous year no matter how much I feed them. I've kept them exactly the same way as all the others and there's something about the conditions it doesn't like but, I think I've got it figured out (in theory anyway). This species is a bit different than most other species in a few different aspects though, most notably....

    A. D.gigantea grows on the margins of often permanent to semi permanent swamps and other bodies of water.
    B. It grows deeper than any other species, often right down to the water table.
    C. This species does not produce a papery covering on the dormant tuber to protect it from dessication.

    Given all this information, I suspect that D.gigantea actually prefers a slightly damp dormancy. I'm getting a half dozen or so this year to try different things on so I can really nail down it's cultivation. I'll post my findings in this thread as well as my photo thread.

    D.hookeri is indeed among the easiest species to grow. It doesn't even always go dormant in more tropical conditions if kept moist all year. Perfect starter species.
    Awesome--thanks! Very helpful. I was slightly worried that the D. gigantea was sluggish to emerge. Good that you're backing me up in that observation.

    Hate to keep asking questions, but just curious: what do you feed your gigantea? Certain nutrients are tied to tuber growth in other (non-CP) species and I'd like to play around with my plant's diet.

    Thanks again for all the info!
    Last edited by theplantman; 11-26-2014 at 01:03 PM.

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    I feed all my tuberous Drosera with Maxsea fertilizer but they also catch small spiders, gnats and other household basement bugs.

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    Very nice guide! Thank you! For the D. erythrorhiza squamosa, you had some bigger particles of rock or something on top of the soil?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatbunny View Post
    Very nice guide! Thank you! For the D. erythrorhiza squamosa, you had some bigger particles of rock or something on top of the soil?
    That is the laterite growing form of the plant so, after several years of growing it my my standard sand mix I decided to put it into a heavy laterite mix. I have seen absolutely no benefit or detriment from doing so. I won't be wasting good laterite on them in the future.

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