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Thread: Drosera (x)? anglica

  1. #9
    sflynn's Avatar
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    Drosera tokaiensis is another plant believed to be from hybrid origin that is D. spatulata x rotundifolia
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-01-2015 at 04:08 PM. Reason: Nomenclature

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Introgressive hybridization is a well-accepted precept for some mechanisms of speciation. And polyploidy can be part of the process, as well.

    I'm sure that Nepenthes are also involved in the speciation process.

    I remember, the very first time I saw wild Drosera rotundifolia. It was adjacent to a little copse of evergreen trees, the copse of trees were facing south, towards the north shore of Lake Michigan, there on Michigan's upper peninsula. I stopped at this spot, because there was a clearing in the overgrowth, and a small sandy beach, where the lake was easily visible. This was while I was on my way to visit Big Manistique Lake, hoping I would see other CP at that lake. Anyway, I was standing, with my back to the trees, and facing the lake, there was a small sand dune between me and those trees. This created a small protected depression, and provided a little shade for the back of the dune and the depression. I was a little frustrated that I hadn't spotted any CP, yet, but just as I was giving up at this location, I turned towards the back side of the dune and Lake Michigan, preparing to climb out of the depression, when, out of the corner of my eye, I noticed that the back side of the dune top (the side facing north, towards the trees), was covered with Drosera rotundifolia plants. These wild plants were the first ever Drosera rotundifolia plants I had ever seen - they were, beautiful, and they immediately stopped me in my tracks. At that angle, they were a little backlit, and sparkled in the sunlight. As I examined them more closely, I was surprised to see that some had rabbit dung stuck on their leaves. Ahh, memories. That was in the late 1970's.
    Joseph Clemens
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  3. #11
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Donald Schnell addresses some of these concerns (Carnivorous Plant Newletter, Vol 28, Dec 1999):
    DROSERA ANGLICA Huds. vs DROSERA ANGLICA: What's the Difference?
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    D. anglica probably started out a very localized plant (though at one point the habitat of D. linearis was also far more widespread), however has since been widely distributed due to waterways and, in the case of the Hawaiian populations, migratory bird routes.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
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  5. #13
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Here is Hudson's 1778 description of Drosera anglica (#3). He also describes Drosera longifolia (#2) which is now considered a synonym of D. anglica from examination of herbarium specimens. All the habitats listed are in England.


    Here is Goldie's 1822 description of Drosera linearis. He notes in appearance it looks like an intermediate (hybrid) between D. anglica and D. filiformis.

    The type specimen was collected from around Lake Simcoe, Ontario, Canada and is the Kew Garden Herbarium.

    Drosera anglica
    was not described as having hybrid origins until 1952 by Lepage and Williams.

    I have found no literature citations, historical records (herbaria speciemens), paleontological records or mitochondrial RNA studies to show Drosera linearis ranging in either Europe or Asia. If you know of any such citations I would be most interested in knowing what they are.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 02-04-2015 at 05:16 PM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    D. anglica probably started out a very localized plant (though at one point the habitat of D. linearis was also far more widespread), however has since been widely distributed due to waterways and, in the case of the Hawaiian populations, migratory bird routes.
    Are you saying coconuts are migratory

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    I never said D. linearis was once found outside North America. Fens however were once more widespread on this continent. D. anglica, being a far more adaptable plant in terms of tolerable habitation, had no such limiting factor which likely allowed it, like D. rotundifolia, to flourish further than that of the original linearis parent.
    And kula, not quite sure what you're trying to get at there... but coconuts are spread by currents, and plants don't move once sprouted, so they can't be migratory.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    If Drosera anglica is the fertile polyploid hybrid of Drosera rotundifolia and Drosera linearis, which somehow migrated to Hawaii, Japan, and most of the northern temperate hemisphere. In all the time it must have taken to colonize so far and wide, how then did it manage to avoid South America and any other tropical locations.

    Just makes me wonder, even more, what a comparison of the genetic fingerprints of Drosera anglica, Drosera rotundifolia, and Drosera linearis, from various locations throughout their ranges, and comparing them, would show.

    For me, it also has me wondering about the history and genesis of the entire Drosera genus.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-04-2015 at 09:03 PM.
    Joseph Clemens
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