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Thread: D. spatulata relatives and flower color

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    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    D. spatulata relatives and flower color

    I have what was sent to me as D. x tokaiensis and D. spatulata "Fraser Island" and I'm worried I got them mixed up label-wise since they're super similar. However, both are flowering now and from what I've gathered the first is generally pink while the latter is white. Is that consistently true to where I should be confident in IDs (assuming I trust the seller in the first place)? I haven't found anything really concrete on flower color for these two but it was just a quick search.
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    According to the fellow in Japan that has been studying D. tokaiensis over there plants with white flowers have not been found in nature.

    I have some man-made D. tokaiensis (sterile) with white flowers. Ivan Snyder has so far without success been attempt to make fertile plants with white flowers. I have not been distributing any of these as of yet but that doesn't mean they are not available from some other source.
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    If it's D. x tokaiensis, it should have deep pink flowers, while Fraser does have white. The former will also not produce seeds while the latter will, all over the place. The fertile D. tokaiensis commonly available also has the deep pink flowers, but if you want an ID now between the two, tokaiensis has the wide lamina similar to its rotundifolia parent, while spat Fraser has the more elongate straplike leaves that most spatulata variants have.
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