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Thread: South American Drosera

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    South American Drosera

    Hello everyone I'm hoping to grow some South American sundews and I was wondering which are the easy to grow.

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    w03's Avatar
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    I've heard from a lot of people that D. graomogolensis is practically indestructible, so if you've never grown any before I guess that would be the place to start.

    I haven't grown mine for long, but D. tomentosa, D. spiralis, and D. kaieteurensis have all been pretty easy (though D. tomentosa definitely seems to be the most vigorous of the three in my conditions).

    If you count them among the other SA Drosera (they aren't closely related, but are native to SA), D. intermedia from Mt. Roraima and D. sessilifolia should be easy to grow as well.
    Last edited by w03; 04-03-2015 at 05:16 PM.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
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    In my experience, D.graomogolensis and D.spiralis are the easiest. Both should be good starter species. D.tomentosa, D.tentaculata, D.felix, D.kaiteurensis and D.latifolia are also fairly easy assuming that you have the proper conditions for them. Avoid starting with species like D.villosa, D.meristocaulis, D.camporupestris, D.solaris, D.roraimae etc... They're much pickier and less forgiving than some of the others

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    Quote Originally Posted by w03 View Post
    If you count them among the other SA Drosera (they aren't closely related, but are native to SA), D. intermedia from Mt. Roraima and D. sessilifolia should be easy to grow as well.
    D.intermedia is not endemic to Mt.Roraima. The plants in cultivation mistakenly under that name are actually from Roraima State, Brazil and not the Tepui.

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    w03's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, I wasn't aware of that! It's also interesting that you've found D. tentaculata to be a forgiving species - it really isn't common at all in cultivation so information on it is relatively sparse.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
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    Thanks I really like the ones to avoid some of them are hard to find

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    w03's Avatar
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    The ones to avoid really are quite nice (D. camporupestris happens to be my favorite Drosera of all) but they need pretty strict HL conditions with a lot of light and may be picky in other ways as well. Most of the beginner species listed are better at handling higher temps than the others.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

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    I'm not saying there not cool or anything I just not have the best environment to keep them manly I have a hard time with temps and I now most don't like high temps

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