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Thread: Hardening off root cuttings

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    cwatson1414's Avatar
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    Hardening off root cuttings

    Hey TF. I have root cuttings of Drosera graomogolensis and Drosera binata "Dwarf Red" that have struck really well. The largest of the D. graomogolensis have 4-5 leaves now. The binata roots were sown later, but are striking robustly and many leaves have fully unfurled. When is it safe to start hardening these off?

    Thanks!

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    Swagalotus's Avatar
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    What do you mean by "hardening off"? Are you currently growing them in higher humidity or lower light that they would need to be hardened off?

    I have a graomogolensis but I have never tried cuttings. I am assuming higher humidity would be beneficial for this species. As for the drosera binata I grow my root cuttings in the same conditions as my mature plants and they never fail to strike and grow well.

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    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwatson1414 View Post
    Hey TF. I have root cuttings of Drosera graomogolensis and Drosera binata "Dwarf Red" that have struck really well. The largest of the D. graomogolensis have 4-5 leaves now. The binata roots were sown later, but are striking robustly and many leaves have fully unfurled. When is it safe to start hardening these off?

    Thanks!
    If you are are propagating them in water, cwatson, are you then asking when you can root them in soil that has more normal moisture levels? I guess I am wondering under what conditions your have gotten them to increase because that will determine your next steps. Congratulations, by the way.
    - Mark

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    cwatson1414's Avatar
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    They are both grown in covered containers in wet moss. This feels like a silly question, but is the root they sprout from their first root? I have been thinking of them like leaf cuttings, and waiting for hem to establish a root system. This is my first time doing root cuttings.

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    Greetings from the netherworld. curtisconners's Avatar
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    As far as I know, root cuttings are tougher than leaf cuttings. But they might still need to be acclimated to lower humidity. I suppose you could think of the root as their first root. Are you growing them in a terrarium? If your not, I'm not sure if they would even need to be "hardened off" if they've been growing in the dry air of a centrally heated home. I'm no expert on cuttings though, all I've managed to take cuttings of is lucky bamboo.

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    Swagalotus's Avatar
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    You can't really consider the root they are growing from as their first root. I don't have a picture, but when I take adelae or binata root cuttings I can clearly see the difference. New roots will start growing from where the new plant connects to the old root. The old root will eventually die off and rot, and you will be left with the plant that is growing its own root system.

    As for acclimating the plantlets you can slowly poke holes in the covering and they will slowly adjust. High humidity is preferred to prevent the cutting from drying out, which is a stage you have already passed. As long as the humidity is decreased slowly, the plants will be fine.

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    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    When the new plantlets look enough like a whole plant, rather than just a sprout, I generally take a small but precise pair of scissors like a cuticle scissors and cut the segment of the original root free on both sides of the plantlet. This will encourage it to produce its own roots. During this phase I maintain all moisture levels only lowering them to an adult plant normal when the new roots have formed. It is worth considering that cutting up the original root might well keep it from producing more new sprouts if you do it too soon. It will bring the plantlets to maturity more quickly if it is not done too early.
    - Mark

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    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    A bit off topic, I admit, but you have me curious ... How big does 'dwarf red' get? Is it smaller in all dimensions or just shorter petioles?
    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



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