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Thread: Drosera falconeri

  1. #1

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    I might be getting one soon... Is there anything special? Are they really rare? Do they eat funny? How can they be propagated? Inspire awe, come on!

    Also, on a side note... The D. rotundifolia I floated on water is starting to get roots at the base of the petiole (underwater)... This happend in less that a week! Maybe four days!!!

  2. #2

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    I have a D.falconeri which i got from Phil Mann. its pretty rare and needs tropical conditions. It requires 88F constantly and needs 100% humidty while being in shaded light. I have mine in a zip locked bag on the windowill with the bag partially shaded by a larger pot of cape sundews. its groqwing slow and is finally producing small new leaves for me. i have it in a mx of sand and peat but it would fair better in peat/perlite. instead of the tray mehtod, i flush the pot with water every other day. it takes alot of work to care for this plant lol. it eats like a rotundfolia. good luck!

  3. #3

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    Thats who I was gonna get mine from... I dont think I want it anymore... I already have to flush my Darlingonia pot... Its not a burden, but it does take some time... Dont think I'm quite ready for it yet. Hehehe... What is Phill Mann's Website again? PM me! Thanks!!!

  4. #4

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    Hi,

    <I>... its pretty rare...</I>

    and defintly NOT a beginners plant. Seems to be on of the most difficult Drosera to cultivate !

    <I>It requires 88F constantly</I>
    hot days and cool nights would be better.

    <I>and needs 100% humidty</I>
    it needs high humidity but not 100%

    <I>while being in shaded light</I>
    I'm not sure about this. But all of the other petiolaris Drosera which I have more experience prefer direct sunlight.

    <I>I have mine in a zip locked bag on the windowill with the bag partially shaded by a larger pot of cape sundews.</I>
    It needs a dry dormancy. (here in Germany during winter)

    <I>i have it in a mx of sand and peat but it would fair better in peat/perlite.</I>
    I grow one plant in a mix of peat/sand the other one in a mix of peat, sand and loam. Some growers recommend growing them in pure sphagnum but I doubt that they survive a dry period in pure sphagnum.
    I have only very(!) few experience with this plant, most of my "advice" is from other growers or readings.

    Martin

  5. #5

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    I have limited experience as well. My plant was in it's growing period when I got it. It may be that dormancy may be foregone, but on this I am unsure. I will see what I can learn and post it here. Warm even temperatures are best, constantly cool days will jepordize the plant. Cool nights are acceptable, but only with warm to hot days. The plants have no problems with temp. as high as 110F if the water and humidity requirements are met. Lower light is good to get the plant over transplant shock, but direct sun is optimal, just remember to acclimate to it in stages. I have mine in 50/50 pearlite/live moss: an airy mix is what to aim for. Do not stand in water, rather water around the rosette daily, preferably with warm water. I feel high humidity is best for this species, others disagree. So far my plant is thriving. Remember that the recommended requirements of full sun and heat are for established plants: most of the petiolaris suffer from transplant shock and need to be nursed slowly into active growth. Placing the newly potted plants in a ziplock bag until good growth is observed is a good idea for almost all Droserae: I have never lost a species using this method. Droserae culture demands patience and attention, especially so for the petiolaris complex. These are not good subjects for those unable or unwilling to spend time attending to them, but they are the most beautiful of all the Droserae, which is a strong incentive. Also they tend to be quite pricey, so this is another good reason to pay close attention to them;-)

  6. #6

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    im pretty new to petiolaris drosera, so im not an expert yet, as you can see im struggling with my own falconeri! Im not sure if its going to live or pass on lol! well, all the info i got were based from other advanced gowers like phill mann. Wish all of us luck_Zach

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