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Thread: Australian drosera

  1. #9

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    Hi guys,

    I've got a couple of questions to answer here.

    Firstly for LA Trapholes questions. The shot of the orchid is an open flower. This species has a bizarre way of achieving pollination. It actually catches insects before releasing them to carry the pollen away. If you look at the top of the flower you'll see a yellow blob. This is the pollen. Flying insects land on the feathery plume poking out the front of the plant and travel inside the flower to get nectar. The flower is very similar to a S. psittacina, D. californica or C. follicularis in that it has areoles which allow light to shine through. The insects head up for the light and pass into a one way tunnel that traps them. As they push their way through they collect the blob of pollen on their back. They then exit through a small hole at the top which you can't quite see. The next flower they visit and pass through gets pollinated. Not quite as good an ending as being devoured by a pitcher plant but a remarkable adaptation none the less.

    If anyone is interested here is a photo of the whole plant-

    [img]http://home.**********.com/kirstyspence/images/Pterostylis%20plumosa1%20Anglesea%20071003.JPG[/img]

    I love Eucalyptus species too. There are some stunning species that rarely get grown but definitaly deserve to.

    I'll answer PlantAKiss's question in my next post.

    Regards,

    Sean.

  2. #10

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    Now to answer your question Suzanne,

    Poaching of native Drosera in my part of the country is very rare. Drosera are not very well known by many people in Australia and are grown by very few. The fact that many of the species are tuberous and die down for much of the year has meant that they are generally not dug up for sale at nurseries or the like.

    Most species of Drosera that grow near to where I live certainly could not be considered rare. As you said they almost grow like weeds in some areas, sometimes covering paddocks and roadsides by the thousands. I wouldn't call them a weed myself though as there are plenty of other weed species that are taking over many of their habitats. Many European and South African species really love the Australian climate.

    I think that very few people see them growing on the side of roads and stop to dig them up. 99 percent of the population would not even know what they were. It would be very easy for anyone to take them but it rarely happens. They don't have the same appeal as some of your Sarracenias. I have rarely ever seen any tuberous Drosera for sale at a nursery or market stall. It's quite strange though that many of the CP growers I know aren't particularly interested in Drosera and probably wouldn't even recognise the species themselves- a bit sad really.

    When I see a field full of Drosera peltata I don't really give it a second thought. I guess I have seen this so many times that I probably don't appreciate them as much as an outsider would. I guess we are a bit spoiled down here. I'd love to take an international visitor out one day and show them some of my favourite CP spots just to see their reaction. That would probably give me a greater feeling of satifaction than seeing them myself.

    So if any of you are ever down here, give me a call.

    Regards,

    Sean.

  3. #11

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    I swear I am coming to see you Sean! We could make each others day I think! I was sent a tuber of D. peltata that made a fine plant, and it was like a myth come true for me. I recently had the pleasure of reviewing Phill Mann's video CD of his expidition into the Northern part of Australia: driving through brush fires and puddles (we call those "ponds" here&#33[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]. It was an amazing, amazing visual account. Phill's camera work was excellent, and I was amazed at how he could spot these species apparently from a good distance away. Hopefully this CD will be on the market in the near future since Phill wants to take the proceeds and produce an even better video. Stay tuned for future details.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  4. #12
    drosera guy
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    Wow! Great news! I would really love to see the video, too. And of course I will visit Sean, if I ever get to Australia...

    Jan

  5. #13

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    I can't wait for the video myself! The northern part of Australia really is an awesome area for CP's.

    Sean.

  6. #14
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    Sean or Tamlin, this is off subject, but I am getting seeds for tuberous sundews. Do you germinate the seeds in the same manner as seeds from non-tuber plants?
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  7. #15

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    Hi Copper,

    It can depend upon which species you have seed of. Species like D. peltata, auriculata, stricyticaulis and a few others germnate readily sown the same as more common species like spatulata and capensis.

    Other species can require pre treatment with smoke water or GA3 to ensure good germination.

    It is also a good idea to sow the seed at the right time of year. Just at the end of summer is probably ideal because you give the seed a full growing season in the cool before they become dormant in summer. Obviously the longer you give them to grow the bigger the tubers will end up and the greater chence they will have coming up the following year.

    Which species of seed have you got?

    Regards,

    Sean.

  8. #16
    Copper's Avatar
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    D.gigantea and D. macrantha. I am hoping that they will germinate within a few months so as to give them time to grow prior to dormancy.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

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