User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Drosera hamiltonii

  1. #1
    Andrew
    Guest
    Hi,
    I posted a message on the CP listserv about some strong growth I've been seeing in my Drosera hamiltonii and one of the PFT moderators (Tamlin) invited me over here to share how I was growing them.

    First a bit of background. I'm in Victoria, Australia. I grow most of my plants outdoors without any covering. Temperatures range from around 0 to 45 degrees Celsius. Most of the Drosera get lightly filtered sunlight. I first tried growing D.hamiltonii around 5 years ago with little success. They were grown in 2:1 peat and sand and watered by tray. Despite the books saying this is an easy species my plants grew OK for a while but quickly went downhill in the cooler months, never growing bigger than an inch. They possibly fair better in the more controlled environment of a terrarium or greenhouse compared to outside.

    About 2 years ago I decided to give D.hamiltonii another try using some techniques that some Australian growers have successfully used for Cephalotus. D.hamiltonii grows in the same area as Cephalotus so I figured it might appreciate the same conditions. I'm basically keeping the plant drier than before but still giving it a constant supply of water. As a result my plants are now putting out strong growth with rosettes reaching diameters of 3" as opposed to 2" mentioned in most books. The plants are grown in a similar mix to my first plants (around 2:1 to 1:1 peat and sand). The pots (I'm using 4") sit in a tray filled with fine pebbles so the plant is sitting on top of the water rather than in it. This way the mix doesn't get waterlogged but the plant still has access to water. The mix in mounded up above the top of the pot and the plant is planted into the top of the mound. The height of the mound is around to 1X the height of the pot. Richard Davion from South Australia recommends this technique for Cephalotus so I thought it was worth trying for D.hamiltonii. What I think is going on is that I'm lowering the water table within the pot so that the upper portion of the mix stays fairly dry but the roots can still reach an adequate supply of water deeper in the pot.

    I'm not recommending this as a technique for everyone but it does seem to work well in my conditions. I don't know how this technique will work in terrariums or greenhouses or in other climates. As I mentioned my D.hamiltonii rosettes are now reaching ~3" from leaf tip to leaf tip. These plants were obtained from a reliable nursery and the local Drosera growers have no problems with its ID so I'm quite confident that what I'm growing is D.hamiltonii. I do not believe it is any type of 'giant' form. I'd be very interested to hear from anyone who has plants of similar size. I'd like to know whether this technique is producing abnormally large growth or whether the size of my plants is not uncommon and what is printed in the literature is indicative of 'average' plants not the plants full potential under normal conditions.

    Best Regards
    Andrew

  2. #2
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia/Zone 7
    Posts
    10,335
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Andrew

    Welcome to the forums! Glad you decided to visit here. That was very interesting. I don't have a hamiltonii (yet) but I will tuck that info away for the future.

    That does sound like a large plant...it must be beautiful. Any photos? We like to see each others plants. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    Thanks Andrew!

    Suzanne
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Andrew, and welcome to the forums. I am very interested in D. hamiltonii cultivation methods. This is another of the serpentine resonsive species that Richard has spoken of before with me.

    I have found the deeper the substrate, the better. The best plants I have ever grown have been in deep pots in high humidity. This is a sporadicly growing species in my cultivation, and I wonder if the growth starts and stops might not be in some way correlated with mycorhizal activity. Possibly maintaining a drier surface allows for the proliferation of a mycorhizal association with the plant, and I believe I will follow your lead this season. My plants are doing ok, but the just are not reaching their flowering potential. The fact that this is a shy flowering species in cultibation may have to do with this "missing element".

    Plants I grew in a deep substrate terrarium flowered at about 3 inches. I think whatever you are giving your plants is optimal, and that you may soon experience this event!

    Are you familiar with Richard's research on Serpentine responsive CP? I have been trying to contact Richard. If you can put me in contact with him, please let me know?
    "Grow More, Share More"

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    988
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Drosera hamiltonii is about 1inch in diameter right now, growing in a 3inch pot of peat/sand (50/50)
    Taproot, Anti-Flag, The Casualties, Alkaline Trio, Eleventeen, Deadsy, AFI...what's not to love?

  5. #5
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    2,539
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome Andrew,

    Is there any chance we could see some pics of your plants.

    I am a very skeptical person by nature and have often received seed of Drosera aliciae from Australia sold to me as seed of Drosera hamiltonii. Not that I doubt your veracity, but I tend to err on the side of caution when it comes to plant ID.

    Link to image at CP Database website



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    173
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Andrew,

    I have two specimens (from different sources) and although they have never reached 3" they have stayed almost constantly around 2" during the 2 repectively 2.5 years that I have had them. I grow them indoors and although they have grown reasonably well in a terrarium I now keep the 5" pot bagged. The soil is 1:1 peat moss/sand with a layer of live sphagnum on top. I water them by soaking the pots for a couple of minutes, and by keeping the pot bagged it takes months until I have to water them again. Unfortunately this does also mean that I can't expose them the sun or they will over-heat. Not to mention that it isn't too appealling to having to open the bag to be able to appreciate their beauty. Anyway my plants are never waterlogged which might be the reason that I have never had any problems with them.

    I am now trying to induce flowering by exposing them to cooler temps outside, but I have taken a root cutting on each of the plants just in case this experiment should go wrong. Two young plants are already on their way and this will mean that I'll be able to try other ways of growing them besides keeping them in bags.

    Regards,

    Christer

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally, even thought this plant grows in peat in Nature, i find it grows better in milled sphagnum. I have noticed the same in the past with D. slackii.

    Regards,

    Joe

  8. #8
    Andrew
    Guest
    Tamlin,
    I don't know if Richard is still online. You can write to him at
    40 Hub Drive
    Aberfoyle Park
    South Australia 5159
    Australia

    I've tried Blue Dawn, Richard's serpentine fertiliser on Cephalotus with little effect. After reading his comments about the fungi this fertiliser is trying to promote I think the optimal temperatures are too narrow for the temperature ranges my plants experience. Still I'm going to try it on VFT's next season (for which it was supposedly designed for). I'm also going to trial some cerium ammonium nitrate which he sent to me on my D.binata's. On the subject of fungi I and other members of the VCPS have been getting some very good results by adding commercial Thrichoderma preparations to our media.

    Joe,
    People who have seen hamiltonii/cephalotus habitat have told me the soil is actually very sandy. In that case using a lighter mix like sphagnum instead of a heavy peat mix would seem like a good idea.

    For those who asked for a picture here it is. The plant is quite different in appearance to my other aliciae. Flowering only occurs in spring (here aliciae will flower all year) and the roots are much thicker than typical aliciae.

    Andrew

    http://www.geocities.com/corymbosa/dhamiltonii.JPG








Similar Threads

  1. And then there is Drosera hamiltonii
    By Joseph Clemens in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-06-2011, 08:00 PM
  2. D. hamiltonii help
    By jack in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-25-2010, 07:44 PM
  3. Ceph and hamiltonii
    By Baylorguy in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-20-2009, 07:04 AM
  4. Drosera hamiltonii and slackii
    By Baylorguy in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-15-2008, 08:41 PM
  5. Hamiltonii & capillaries
    By imported_cephalotus88 in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-19-2002, 10:14 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •