User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 14 of 14

Thread: D. rotundifolia "evergrow"

  1. #9
    Guest
    Tamlin- what conditions did you have your seeds in when they germinated? I'm worried I might be keeping them too cool..

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    319
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote
    Drosera rotundifolia 'Evergrow' is a hybrid cross of 2 populations of Californian D. rotundifolia (Gasquet CA X Willow Lake N. Plumas Co.) The resulting plants have forgone dormancy requirements. This is another of friend Ivan Snyder's experiments. I believe he has applied for cultivar status for the plant. Now people in the tropics can grow this beautiful species. The plants are smaller than the typical form (at least so far).[/QUOTE]

    I remember reading that Ivan posted a message on the CP Listserv regarding it being crossed w/ another Drosera species to remove the hibernation trait. I think it was several generations back, such that the hybrid labelling was no longer a factor. I'll see if I can locate it again.

    In the meantime, Ivan said,
    Quote
    I may register this new form as a cultivar, but I have one problem. The
    plant produces less seed than normal. I think some other gene might have
    been knocked out too. Hopefully with more breeding fertility will be
    improved. I would register it now but I'm not sure I could call the
    offspring by the same name after further breeding.[/QUOTE]
    (from http://epm.ucdavis.edu/htbin/mxarchi...2002-06/20506)

    I'm not exactly sure how the labelling and the controlling of the original "Evergrow" batch should be maintained at this point.

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    319
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Took some effort in brute force searching, but I found it...

    Quote
    One more backcross of this fertile D. x obovata
    with it's tetraploid D. rotundifolia parent and it should be
    indistinguishable from pure D. rotundifolia. This will be as Jan's belief
    that D. tokaiensis is essentially D. spatulata. And according to what Jan
    says about the nomenclatural rules, I could name the new tropical form D.
    rotundifolia 'EverGrow'.[/QUOTE]
    (from http://epm.ucdavis.edu/htbin/mxarchi....2002-01/9708)

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Evergrow germinated in normal room conditions for me, but the germination was sparse.

    As for the labeling, I will ask Ivan about that, and see if he has performed the new cross. It is a good question. Thanks for the research!

    I just got Ivan's self made D. anglica temperate form. He said that he has only sent it to me (an honor&#33[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] so I think this qualifies as the rarest Drosera species in my collection! It is tetraploid, so the seed will be fertile. I hope to do some testing of it's ability to form hibernacula and survive the winters here, as well as looking at the germination percentages.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #13
    Guest
    I thought all anglica was temperate? or is there something else special about this one?
    Our wild D. anglica here survives winters very well and seems to self polinate so it produces abundant seed. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] Good luck with yours

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ivan has also made a tropical variety of Drosera anglica by crossing the Californian and Hawaiian strains of D. anglica. There is no dormancy for this very beautiful hybrid.

    The only difference regarding the other mentioned plant is that it was man made, rather than occuring spontaneously. The populations crossed were from California and Canada and would never have happened without intervention. Still, its genetic makeup is unique!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  7. Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

    Similar Threads

    1. Heliamphora sp. "Akopan," "Amuri," "Angasima" . . .
      By BigBella in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
      Replies: 26
      Last Post: 10-14-2009, 02:34 AM
    2. Replies: 12
      Last Post: 07-29-2008, 06:33 PM
    3. Replies: 7
      Last Post: 07-26-2008, 11:06 AM
    4. Replies: 7
      Last Post: 07-07-2008, 12:30 PM
    5. D. capillaris x rotundifolia "evergrow"
      By homer in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
      Replies: 8
      Last Post: 04-12-2005, 11:35 AM

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •