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Thread: Drosera glanduligera photos

  1. #9

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    Hi Tamlin,

    The plants in the first photo are probably around 3/4 of an inch in diameter and were found growing on a ridge in very dry (baked hard) loamy soil. They weren't very common in this area. The roots would have had to be massively long to get down to any hint of moisture. This population was found much more inland than you will generally find them on this side of the country.

    In other areas close by they were found in much greater populations (hundreds of thousands) in very sandy soil. They definitely seemed to prefer the sand. The D. peltata and D. macrantha ssp. planchonii grew much more prolifically there also.

    The plant from the third image is one from the coastal heathlands. The plant actually grew in sandy soil on the side of a wet depression and was much more robust than others which grew nearby in drier soil. This plant would have easily been over an inch in diameter.

    I've seen the plants growing very close to seeps below dams in loamy soils. I've also seen them growing over in WA in very sandy soil (almost pure sand) in areas that are seasonally quite damp. All in all it seems as though they can adapt to a range of environments but seem to prefer dry, open sandy areas close to the coast.

    I've never had much luck growing this species from seed either. I reckon that GA might be worth a try though. I plan on collecting some seed soon (the plants are extremely common here) and trying out a few germination methods. I've heard that sowing the seeds early (ie- late summer) and placing the pot outside can work well (OK if you have the correct environment), I'll definitely give this a try myself.

    Strangely I've never actually stopped to see how quickly the D. glanduligera leaves can engulf prey. The leaf structure is very similar to a D. burmannii which moves incredibly quickly so I imagine this would be the case for glanduligera as well. Next time I'm out I'll make sure I take a better look and report my findings.

    Regards,

    Sean.

  2. #10
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Seandew

    Thanks for the photos and information. They are just beautiful! You are so lucky to be where you can see these plants in their natural habitat. And so many!

    Wonderful photos...those flowers are really something!

    Suzanne
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #11

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    OK here is one of my pics...



    Im not real happy with this pic, it's not very sharp... and I'm not going to post the others...

    But I did think this came out quite nicely, and orchid with a dodder growing on it!


    George

  4. #12

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    I sowed seed of this species in August using a wet stratification similar to that for Sarracenia seed, but in a more sandy mix. Seed was kept in the fridge until December, when it was placed into cultivation. There was no germination by Feb. which is a frozen month here. I placed the pots outside where they would be watered by occasional rains but sheltered. In June I noticed germination: sparse but exciting!!!

    I have heard of growers in Australia that have the plants literally in their backyard, but seed will not germinate for them either when placed in pots!

    I wonder how such a tiny plant can withstand such harsh conditions as you mention! It isn't a pygmy species, so presumably lacks the deep roots that they have to get them through dry conditions. If you get a chance, maybe you could see how long the roots really are in habitat. I would be very interested in learning this.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #13

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    Hi Tamlin,

    Next time I'm out I'll check out how deep the roots are. Should be pretty easy in a nice sandy spot. I'll stay away from the hard baked loams. I don't have the plants growing in my backyard unfortunately but have known those who have.

    Regards,

    Sean.

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