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Thread: Drosera capensis...which for is typical?

  1. #9

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    Doh, and all I wanted was a D. Capensis 'Giant Purple Merry-go-round forked leaf'. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]
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  2. #10

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    Well I have to get in on this one! Allen Lowerie lists all sorts of Drosera capensis variations in his catalog, and this returns us once more to the question of exactly what "typical" really means. This typical form refers to the "type" collection, a representative of which must be placed in a herbarium before publishing the protolouge of the "species novae". This representative sample cannot reflect all the variations found in a population, and indeed the various literature and Keys must be taken with a measure of leeway for different appearing members of a given population. Taxonomy attempts to reduce this indivduality to basic fundamentals, but these organic beings will never be exactly defined by these efforts of typification. Just like you and I, they are all individuals. Taking a typical representative of a species is like choosing one American to represent all Americans.
    In regards to the variations of D. capensis "typical" and "wide leaf", I agree with Vic's assessment. In appearance at maturity they are quite different. Sadly, because so few forms are registered, there is no central reference to be consulted, and one mans narrow leaf is another mans typical. Only by growing on material from other sources and observing it relative to what you believe the typical form is will you ever really know if what another is referring to as typical is what you are growing by the same name! This is an excellent reason not to turn your backs on the lowly D. capensis, if you already have it: the population members are individuals, and this will become apparent the more you try what other growers are cultivating. Maybe 9 times out of 10 it will look very similar to your plants, ahhh, but that 10th time.....!!!

    Forms that I have found to be distinct from each other are D. capensis typical, thin leaf, wide leaf, all red, x rubra and albino ("alba" is incorrect). Most of these names are unregistered. I have found the "giant" forms to be largely a matter of cultivation difference, but if anyone has what they feel is a truly giant form, I am interested in growing it!

    My personal favorite is the x rubra: an all red form with very long petioles. I'll try to get a photo up of some of my capensis forms soon.
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  3. #11
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Situations like this are precisely why the registration of cultivars (cultivated varieties) is so helpful. Don't forget that presently it costs nothing but a little thought and time to register a cultivar of a CP.

    Check out this link:
    Registering CP Cultivars
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #12

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    So what one is the more common type sold in stores?
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    Question

    Well here is what we know:
    True Narrow Leaf do not form branchings stems (normally)
    Albino has white flowers with pink glands (who the heck named this one, thats not albino, lol)
    Red is red
    Typical is green leaf, red galds, produces branches.

    Now, someone go and define a minimum standard for wide leaf!
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  6. #14

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    Here is a photo of the leaf detail on D. capensis wide leaf from my plant.

    http://206.103.248.175/tamlin_....ail.jpg
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  7. #15

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    Here is the "x rubra" form. The plant is reported to have come from the Bonn Botanical Gardens. I have never seen the like of it. This was taken in deep winter, and the plant has lost its typical red overall color in the petioles. You can see the tall graceful form though.

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  8. #16

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    Arrow

    Wow, cool, it looks like a better colored narrow-leaf. Do you have an average width to the wide leaf type? It seems that it should be defined by that, at least in part.
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