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Thread: What?

  1. #1

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    hey i was wondering what type of dorsera could take cold temps like 50 to 70 degrees far.Thanks,
    Kevin
    Kevin Peterson
    Grosse Pointe, MI

  2. #2

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    The answer would be virtually all of them not requiring a complete winter dormancy (i.e. arcturi, the North American temperate species, stenopetala, uniflora - did I forget any...?)

    There are other considerations though: some have different growing seasons than others. Plants from the Southern Hemisphere have their seasons reversed and grow in winter, and have summer dormancy.

    The petiolaris complex as well on a whole prefers more heat 70-100F is good.

    As a general rule of thumb though, most DROsera prefer cool temps. and very few appreciate warm roots.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #3

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    what would you recomend for a North American winter dormacy that could live on a windowsill?
    Thanks, Kevin
    Kevin Peterson
    Grosse Pointe, MI

  4. #4

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    Any species not requiring the winter dormancy would fit this temperature range. Does your windowsill get direct sun, and how much during the winter months? Drosera species need a good deal of sun, or they need bright flourescent lighting. If you can give them enough light, the temperature range you suggest is suitable for all the tropical species from South Africa, South America, all spatulata, pygmy species (if kept within several inches of the lights), the binata complex, D. capillaris, burmanii. Read the above post on natalensis and madagascariensis where I give the names of the South African tropicals. You might get away with D. peltata and D. auriculata. The temperature for the non-temperate species is not the most important concern, except for the South American species, but rather light. A windowsill in winter can be too dark: here in upstate NY it is cloudy almost every day, and supplemental lighting is a must to successfully grow these species.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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