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Thread: South African Droserae

  1. #17

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    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #18

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    Aren’t those sub-species of pygmy sundews? They grow in South Africa? Odd, isn’t it dry over there?

    travis
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  3. #19

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    South Americans eh, hmmm...lets see what i can dig up lol:

    Here are my plants:

    Drosera venusta
    Drosera nidiformis
    Drosera collinsiae
    Drosera ssp. rhodesia (i thought it was a form of madagacariensis)

    Odd, it seems i do better with south americans then pygmy dews. I wonder why lol.

    Oh yea, Tony, I LOVE that glabripes. Gotta hook me up [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] .

    And for my soil mixes: nidiformis, collinsiae, and sp. rhodesia are in peat/sand (50/50) while my venusta is thriving in a mix of long fibered sphagnum (ran out of peat/sand lol, so i stuck it in sphagnum lol, hey it works)
    Taproot, Anti-Flag, The Casualties, Alkaline Trio, Eleventeen, Deadsy, AFI...what's not to love?

  4. #20

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    Hi Travis,

    Pygmy Drosera are all native to Australia. These are, in fact, from South Africa.

    Coccicaulis is most probably from the Cape area, and Robert Gibson says: "and it is worth noting that sundews from near Humansdorp, on the southern coast of South Africa are morphologically very similar to this variant" in his ACPS article. The plant was never formally described, so there is no type specimen.

    Venusta was properly and formally described by Debbert
    and the type specimen was from north George in the Oteniqua Mts. (Mountains always imply cool conditions).

    South Africa falls into the southern Temperature Zone enjoying a warm climate all year round. A Mediterranean climate prevails along the Cape coast with winter rainfall. Summer is from October to March.
    Temperature varies from lows of 15º C (60º F) to highs of 30º C ( 96º F), with occasional chilly nights.

    Winters require warm clothing, and are wet from frequent rains. Winter is from April to September.
    Temperature vary from lows of 0º C (32º F) to highs of 18º C ( 66º F).


    Humidity is high in the summer, less in the winter and less the further inland you go. There is a lot of sun in both seasons.



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  5. #21

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    Thanks Tamilin, that is very well explained [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] . That would be neat to visit some day (most likely some year). Interesting, learn some thing new every day.

    travis
    \"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.\"
    -- Oscar Wilde

    http://www.nasarracenia.org/

  6. #22

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    Here is an example of the variation beween "coccicaulis" and "venusta" Compare both Gardenofeden and Tony's photos with the plant called "venusta" as seen in this link:

    http://www15.brinkster.com/nswcps/

    You can see first hand how the form types blurr together. Greg Bourke's plant in the photo has the longer petiole like Gardenofeden's plant, and the coloration of Tony's.

    The South African's are a collectors despair, and a taxonomists nightmare, but it lends a good perspective to the science of taxonomy. It is our human nature to try to catagorize, and to try to understand the whole by observing the pieces individually. The process of speciation through evolution takes place on a timescale we cannot envision. Like trying to understand a movie from seeing only a few frames, or even a thousand.

    I like the idea that in South Africa at least for now, science must stand awestruck at the power of individual beauty. As a collector I am overjoyed at the thought that there will always be opportunity to experince a new form in the South African plants.

    This is another great reason to share seed of these plants; you might get something new and interesting from the other grower's who have the same named plant as you. Don't just assume your natalensis or venusta or aliciae is the "real deal" and miss out on all those other potentially beautiful plants and forms (and who knows: your aliciae may be the most beautiful of all)!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  7. #23

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    I came upon this article in my researching the South Africans: a very good one by Robert Gibson, and it also discusses the other carnivorous genera in SA.

    http://www.plantzafrica.com/veldflora/1999/carnivs1.htm

    Some nice photos here!



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  8. #24
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    Tony
    I have seen glabribes in the wild and it grows in DRY scrub, scrambling through the bushes on a long stem, not in wet bogs & flushes like the other spp. perhaps you are keeping it too wet?
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

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