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Thread: Factors of dew production

  1. #1
    C_Skinner
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    Can anyone give me a few details on what affects the amount of dew a Drosera produces? My Nidiformis doesnt seem to have much and the same with a few others. Thanks a lot

    Chris

  2. #2

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    Higher humidity and temperature seems to help my tropical Drosera. I haven't had D. Nidiformis long enough yet to tell about it though. Thanks to Jeremiah for having it at all [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] !

    SF

  3. #3
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    Hi Chris, welcome to the forums.
    There could be a couple of things. First thing that comes to mind is humidity. Most drosera like the humidity to be over 50%, and some like it much more humid than that (I can't really say on the Nidiformis, as I don't grow that one).

    There could be other environmental factors, also, but that's the first one that jumps to my mind.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  4. #4
    C_Skinner
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    Ok how would u suggest i increase it? at the moment its just on a west facing windowsill with a net curtain. Not sure what the humidity is tho..... Shall i just cover it with some plastic? Thanks for the welcome by the way [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] Thanks

    Chris

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    You could try putting it in a fish bowl or aquarium ( I don't know if that would fit in your window). You most likely won't need to cover the top, just providing wall will increase the local humidity...By the way, what part of the country (or world for that matter) do you live in? That might give us some better ideas.

    You could also try doing a google seach on "Drosera nidiformis" and look for cultivation info....like temp requirements (good though SF), medium (soil) requirements, water requirements, etc. Or, if you're lucky, Tamlin Dawnstar will reply to this thread.
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  6. #6
    C_Skinner
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    Im in the UK..... Ive been in contact with Tamlin about a little project im starting similar to the one he done with the Enchanted Drosera forest thats on his web site. Thanks

    Chris

  7. #7
    C_Skinner
    Guest
    Sorry that was a bit short lol..... I have a propagator lid i could try and cover it with i gues..... Ive also increased the water table quite a bit. The water level is half the height of the pot. Ive found this has slightly improved the amount of dew allready. But there still isnt as much as i see on most other growers plants

  8. #8

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    In my opinion, humidity requirements are far too overstressed for this genus. The single greatest factor affecting dew production is probably light. Hard grown plants are capable of dew production even in low humidity.

    Plants grown from seed acclimate to your conditions. Such seeldings will tolerate lower humidity, and will generally be happy, unless you live where the RH is below 40%. If you can grow Sarracenia and VFT's without cover, you can grow Drosera as well in the same way.

    If your plant is not from seed, it is likely suffering from an adjustment problem. It may have been grown very "soft" in a terrarium. You need to optimize all your conditions, since it is likely that it is not one thing alone that is affecting your plant.

    A dewless plant could be travel stressed, affected by a fungal attack that hits the stalked glands while the rest of the oplant looks ok, if a little pink. Other factors (and remember it is most likely a set of things that is affecting your plant) include root damage, impure water, or low humidity. Increasing the humidity may help, but it sounds as if you need to increase the light as well. Be sure you increase the light in gradual stages: Drosera need 5 hrs. of hard light (the kind that casts a shadow when you put your hand in it) per day if supplemental lighting is not used.

    I hope this helps! If your plant fails, let me know and I will provide you with some seed. Seed is really the way to go with this genus!
    "Grow More, Share More"

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