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Thread: D. dilatatopetiolaris

  1. #1

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    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] Hey, this fabulous plant is finally growing well for me after moving it to terrarium culture where i can get higher temperatures.

    This plants are all from the same seed batch (from ICPS seedbank), and as you can see plants growing together under the same conditions can look different. THis happens a lot with petiolaris complex droseras.

    Hope you enjoy the picture [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]


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    Seb,

    Nicely grown plants! Thanks for the photos. Variability is the rule with the petiolaris complex plants. I had one D. lanata that has made an offset to the side. One had nearly glabarous petioles with small traps, the other silvery petioles covered with dendritic hairs, and small traps. They are the same plant, but you would never know it by comparing them! This D. lanata is currently dormant as is the D. dilatato-petiolaris. I doubt the dilatato will return, it did not appreciate the freeze over the winter.

    It may interest you to learn that I got numerous offsets from my plant by removing some of the basal leaves, and repotting into a larger pot so the newly exposed stem was just covered by the medium. My plant made 6 offsets, sadly all withered after the plant froze.

    I had a similar effect with D. falconeri.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    zappafan's Avatar
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    Tamlin, I have a theory that the Petiolaris complex may outcross more readily,and thereby it exhibits alot of genetic variance. Maybe, since they do not(to my knowledge) self readily, that the flowers are very attractive to pollinators.

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    Sounds like a good propagation method tamlin. Thanks for the info, maybe i will try it in the future when the plants are mature.

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    Very nice indeed.

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    Zappa Fan,

    I agree with you on the point of the members of the Petiolaris Complex forming ready hybrids: all the members hybridize without restriction, and the progeny so produced is also capable of further hybridization. That certainly accounts for variability in many plants, but I have heard of remarkable variability being expressed even in material placed into tissue culture, where the genetic composition is identical, yet the plants appear distinct from each other. I still would like to learn how this is possible. When I studied biology in college, tissue culture and cloning was in its infancy so I know little of the processes involved that would explain this tendency.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Hi all,

    This is really unexplainable in tc unless the genes which control color etc. are easily affected by chemicals. I would be interested in knowing what part of the plant was used to start the tc, whether the variety happened in first or second+ generation tc, and what kind of variety there was.

    I could imagine that in a complex with a diverse history the genetics might be so unstable that a few odd cells throughout the plant have varying genetic data and that these cells are rare enough that they don't affect the overall look of the parent plant. If these cells then reproduced into plants in tc you could get a different "clone" so to speak. I see this as a nearly impossilbe theory though.

    About variability in the petiolaris complex, sean samia has done various experiments and crosses which indicate that most of the petiolaris complex "species" are in fact hybrids, and that the entire complex originated from only 2 or three differing varieties. If this is indeed the case then most of the peiolaris "species" do most likely have a very complex history with many parents, and thus a great amount of genentic variation in the resulting seeds.

    cheers,

    -noah

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