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Thread: Drosera cuneifolia

  1. #1

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    Anyone growing this species? Like you Tom :-) I need some advice on growing this one as I may be getting it, maybe.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #2
    drosera guy
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    Hi William,

    I think treating it like a subtropical will do it. In winter it sometimes dies back to it roots. Then you should keep them somewhat drier than during the rest of the year. One of my friends grew it this way for some years. Sadly it died last year.

    I have some seedlings and I am waiting to see the shape of leafs. Hope they are real...

    Jan

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    Hi Jan,

    I have heard that the use of osmunda fiber as a medium might be a good idea since the plant seems to fare poorly in the standard mixes.

    I am probably getting too excited about this, but I don't want to make any mistakes if the plant turns out to be the true species (this has never been the case to date).

    Thanks for the reply!
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Hi Tamlin,

    I am currently growing it as others african sundews, but I am suspicious about its ID (ah, what a common feeling!). I got a lot of mis-IDed seeds recently, from differents sources, and my growlist should shorten of few species within the next weeks, as soon as I'll post them here (such as D.montana ssp tomentosa, affinis, coccicaulis, cuneifolia but this one is still too small for doing anything with it yet...).

    The seeds have been sown in a plastic container with a lid, and stored on a shelve when i was away in New-Brunswick. There were sown on the 'classic' mix (2:1 peat:sand), and they etiolated a bit since they hadn't enough light. Even if they are 6 months old (at least) they are still 1/3" in diameter (even less), so a careful repotting is planned for today... I'll try either sphagnum or the classic mix, and see what happens. Hopefully, if they grow well, i should be able to post few pics by x-mas

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    Hi Tamlin,

    At the moment I have 2 lots of seedlings from different and 'guaranteed reputable' sources. They both are around 5mm in diameter and still too small to determine whether they are authentic or not. They were sown in a mix of 50/50 peat/sand and seem to be thriving. They slowed down for a while as the weather changed down here and started to warm up, but they have since taken off again. I'm hoping by the end of our summer that I'll have mature plants.

    Regards,

    Sean.

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    Sean,

    I am hoping still to be as lucky as you were with seed of this species [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] Maybe with the cooler temps I will finally see some germination.

    One thing that should be evident even in small rosettes is the near lack of a petiole, and the truncate lamina. Older plants will show a sort of bulge effect along the lamina superficially as in D. burmannii and D. slackii if you get my drift.

    As to finding the true species, there are always problems as Tom noted above. It is a familiar feeling indeed when it comes to any South African species IMO. As a horticulturalist I seek different forms, and this contents me. I name them as I see them through the light of experience. So far though, I have found nothing that would lead me to think it was D. cuneifolia. Life is tough sometimes!

    Ok. Based on what you say, I'll ease back on the worry. I might try some form of greater aeration than 50/50 P/S, my logic being this is the most typical mix, and most typical growers end up losing this species. If you have gone nearly a season, then it is promising!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  7. #7

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    Tamlin,

    I thought I'd try and get a closeup of my seedlings at the moment. It isn't as clear as I'd like but you can still see enough detail. What do you think of these plants? Would you say they are matching what you would expect a very small D. cuneifolia to look like? I'm still hoping they turn out to be true. They don't seem to have much of a petiole and the leaves are nearly truncate (maybe they'll get a bit blunter as they age).

    [img]http://home.**********.com/seanspence/images/Drosera%20cuneifolia%20seedling.JPG[/img]

    Regards,

    Sean.

  8. #8

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    I think you have at least a contender for the title there Sean, but if I were you I would continue to seek a second opinion from someone who has actually grown the plant.....Stefan perhaps or Greg Bourke come to mind.....
    "Grow More, Share More"

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