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Thread: Photo: D. montana var tomentosa

  1. #9

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    Thanks for reassuring me Christer. Hopefully I'll be able to share some of this seed with you, I haven't forgotten your generosity with the seed from your own plants.

    Any chance of posting a photo of your plants?



    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #10

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    Hi Tamlin,

    I have no new photos of this species, so you'll probably recognize the rosette pic from before. Here are also two old pics of the flower.





    Apart from that they self-seed they also spread readily from the roots. Although they are not as rampant, plantlets have also appeared in species like D. villosa var. ascendens, D. communis, D. esmeraldae and D. roraimae. I'm still waiting to see flowers in some of the mentioned species, but at least there are other ways to multiply them [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    Regards,

    Christer

  3. #11

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    beutiful plants. My tomesntosa right now is quite lime green, but sending up one hairy scape. Hope to share seed soon-Zach
    Taproot, Anti-Flag, The Casualties, Alkaline Trio, Eleventeen, Deadsy, AFI...what's not to love?

  4. #12

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    Hey Tamlin, I'm happy to see such beautiful specimens D.montana var.tomentosa (or simply D.tomentosa, if you subscribe to Saint Hilaire's taxonomy versus that of Diels) in cultivation. I too love the hairyness of the scapes on this form (widespread in N Minas Gerais & S Bahia states). The Serra da Canastra form as well as others from S Minas Gerais and Goias are usually less hairy or even glabrous. As far as I know all Brazilian sundews are self fertile, with a possible exception being D.montana var.schwackei. Thomas Carow has had a single specimen since 1987 and it never produced seeds (last I heard, in 1998 I think). We even thought it was a hybrid, until I finally found the plants in the wild in 1997. This plant definitely deserves species status, it is VERY different from D.montana and D.tomentosa.

    Fernando Rivadavia

  5. #13

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    I cultivate some other forms of D. tomentosa (guess that answers the question of my preference in taxonomists) with glabarous scapes (flowering now as well!). Thanks for the reassurance regarding the seeds. I will also make like a bee!

    I failed with the D.montana var.schwackei, not realizing it needed a drier substrate . Now I know better and I hope one day to have the opportunity to try to cultivate this species again. It's a real beauty, and I love the colors in the photos from the field! It certainly seems very distinct from either D. montana or D. tomentosa (I see the sense of these being regarded as varieties, I think: either the differences are subtle, or both my plants were the same: the flowers of both were identical to my eye, and seemed to be D. tomentosa).




    Thanks for the nice compliment about the plant. The HID lighting really tends to keep the plants typical (and you should see my D. graminifolia!!!).
    "Grow More, Share More"

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