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Thread: differences between D. capensis

  1. #1
    goldtrap2690's Avatar
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    i have all 4 forms of D. capensis, typical , narrow , alba and all red . the typical and the narrow form looks the same to me but i here narrow has nicer leaves that are more held up and the leaves are more narrow then the typical and also that the narrow does not form a stalk . i don't know for sure and otehr websites that have told me info on the differences has been very confusing . can anyone explain ?




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    I thought we just had this discussion? I sympathize with your confusion, but there is simply no way to define the characteristics of the various circulating forms of Drosera capensis with regards to the width of the lamina. I have several forms of varrying width. First you need to free yourself of the concept of a "typical" form of D. capensis. There is no typical form in this highly variable species. As I have said before what a person regards as "typical" is purely an internal concept as it now stands. Until someone publishes a cultivar standard, with descriptions and photos, there is no way for anyone to be sure that they have the most narrow leaved form possible, or even the widest.

    In my collection, the most narrow leaved form I grow is smaller overall in proportion compared to what seems to be the most commonly grown variety, but there is no difference in the way the lamina are held. I think that the most common form in cultivation is what most people refer to as "typical", but the distinctions between them are not very major: one is smaller reaching perhaps 4 to 5 inches in heigth and this is less commonly found. The common variety may reach about 6-8 inches. The difference width of the leaves between the 2 is less than half as great vs the wide leaf form which has much shorter leaves that are nearly double the width of the commonly grown form.

    Drosera capensis 'Albino' is a registered cultivar, and it conforms in my estimation to the commonest form in both size and lamina width, although lacking the red glands, and with a white flower.

    There are 2 all red forms I am aware of: one is closer to the wide leaf variety, but all red in good light. The other is markedly different: the petioles are much longer, and the lamina are held distinctly more erect, in width it is similar to the commonly grown variety.

    Details of size implied in the "Giant" forms should be rejected, since cultivation techniques and growing conditions vary from grower to grower. I have yet to see any D. capensis that I consider genetically "Giant" in an of itself. I have had "Giant" forms produce average sized plants, and small varieties become quite large with good cultivation.

    Finally, there are many other forms besides the ones you mention, although I do not cultivate them. Allen Lowerie lists a whole slew of them on his seed list, all probably demonstrating some distinct character from the commonest form.

    This same reasoning also applies to the range of forms to be found in Dionaea: without a central reference there is no way to intelligently compare or discuss these different forms much as we would all like to be able to do this.

    So, logic dictates that until such forms become registered, all attempts to discuss these variabilities are in vain. The answers won't change, because they cannot change, and there is no "authority" that can state otherwise: not I, or The Savage Bible, or any PhD taxonomist. Until someone creates a standard of comparison, such a standard does not exist. Without such a standard, we have nothing to compare our plants to, and opinions as to what constitutes a "narrow leaf" are just that: personal opinions.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    There is a "capensis giant" or "broard leaf" around here in Australia. It is a bit larger than the normal one you see around here. The main difference is in the width of the leaf, both the petiole and lamna are much broarder. I have one growing but is a bit sorry at the moment so I am a bit embaressed to post a pic of it now but here is a pic from its healthier days. I had to load it as a link not a pic for some reason [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif[/img]

    http://members.optushome.com.au/chfr/giantcape.htm

    A friend told me his is about 30cm in diameter at the moment. The flowers are also different. They are larger and a darker colour on a much larger scape then the normal variety.

    I have moved it to a less humid area to try to get some seed set. I have some seedlings from this plant at the moment but they are a bit to small to comment on yet (at about 2mm) [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    George

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    Other than the fact you say the size is overall larger, this looks just like my "wide leaf" form. Maybe it is just happier in Australia: I know I'd be!
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Here is a photo of my D. capensis wide leaf. Its definitely a more robust form than any of my other capensis. Its my favorite. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] Notice to the left the skeleton of a hapless crane fly...couldn't get away from those thick "arms".

    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Yep, thats what my plant looks like. I worked out why my plant was going backwards, it has rotted at the base. Hopefully it will set some seed before the main plant passes on. It already has a new, healthy, shoot [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    My capensis albino has grown huge, leaves #### near 8 inches long, so I wonder if there really is a 'giant' form?

    George

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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Wow...that sounds like a beauty! My albinos tend to be a bit smaller and less robust. You can see an 'Albino' leaf to the right in my photo...the plants are growing side by side and same care, but the wide leaf is twice the size.

    Any photos of that 'Albino' George? I would love to see that. The 'Albinos' are quite pretty and I'll bet thats quite a sight. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    Suzanne
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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