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Thread: Drosera schizandra

  1. #17

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    Just a thought on rainforest. Assuming this plant is from a TRUE rainforest and not a tropical wet/dry forest the rain water will have 1 of several methoids of reaching the plant.

    A) multi layer raining. Aka, it rains up high and evaporates before it hits the ground, but then starts raining again on a lower level.

    B) rain does not reach it and it lives off of the high humidty levels surounding it.

    C) rain somehow makes it to the plant via runoff which contains almost 0 nutrients because all the plants that it passed by on it's way down sucked the nutrients out of the water as it passed them because nutrient compitition is fearce in the rainforest.

    If it is actually a seasonally wet/dry tropical forest THEN you could expect high nutrient levels in run-off.

    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] just adding to the pool ecological data since I took that class last semester and it's still fresh in my mind.

    Experimenting is fun isn't it? I wonder if the reson my VFTs don't self propigate but have gigantic root systems is because I grow them in dry conditions (dry in conparison to most growers, average for the wild plants in the sandy areas) like it seems to be with this sundew. I'll have to switch some to high water levels and see what happens.
    There is no item greater in value than life, for without life value would cease to exist.
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  2. #18
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Homer,

    Sounds like your plants may be experiencing a nutrient/micronutrient deficiency, perhaps iron and/or magnesium/manganese -- even nitrogen? How do you feed your Drosera schizandra?

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]SYMPTOMS OF MICRONUTRIENT SHORTAGES IN PLANTS
    By Cleo Palmer

    The following symptoms are for plants in general and not for irises specifically. It is likely, however, that they would be similar in irises in most cases.

    Many of the micronutrients are carried over in the organic matter in the soil, and many soils are becoming deficient in organic matter, resulting in micronutrient deficiencies. Minor plant growth element shortages are the greatest in sand and sand-loam soils, but outright deficiencies are showing up in some clay soils as well.

    Nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium are the recognized primary plant growth nutrients.

    Calcium, magnesium and sulphur are the identified secondary nutrients. This does not mean that they play a secondary role in growth. They are as important to plant nutrition as are the recognized primary nutrients.

    Many plants contain as much sulphur as phosphorous and sometimes more. Secondary nutrient deficiencies can depress plant growth as much as the major nutrient deficiencies.

    Calcium in plants stimulates root and leaf development. It forms compounds which are part of cell walls. Poor root growth is one common symptom of calcium deficiency.

    Magnesium is a mineral constituent of plant chlorophyll. It is actively involved in photosynthesis. An atom of magnesium, as one example, is at the heart of every chlorophyll molecule. Magnesium also aids in phosphate metabolism, plant respiration and the activation of several enzyme systems within the plant. Magnesium deficiency symptoms usually appear on lower older leaves. It shows as a yellowish-reddish color, while the leaf veins remain green.

    Sulphur is essential in forming plant proteins because it is a part of certain amino acids, the building blocks of protein. Sulphur is fairly well distributed throughout the tissues of the plant. Sulphur deficiency shows up as a pale green color in plants, generally appearing first on younger leaves. Leaves tend to shrivel as the deficiency progresses. Leaves die only in extreme cases, although plants can die in the seedling stage. Sulphur deficiency shows up most often in sandy soils low in organic matter in areas of moderate to heavy rainfall.

    Organic matter decomposing in the soil influences how much sulphur is available to the living plant. The reduction of some pollutants in the atmosphere has reduced the amount of sulphur once available to plant growth.

    Aside from the three secondary plant growth elements (calcium, magnesium, and sulphur) there are seven recognized micro-nutrients needed for plant growth. These are boron, copper, chlorine, iron, magnesium, zinc, and molybdenum. It is widely held that acid soil conditions will reduce the availability of iron, magnesium, boron, copper and zinc.

    A key to plant deficiency is the color change in the lower leaves as follows:

    Nitrogen: Plants light green -- lower leaves yellow.

    Phosphate: Plants dark green -- leaves and plants small.

    Potassium: Brown discoloration and scorching along outer margin of lower leaves.

    Manganese: Lower leaves have a yellow discoloration between veins. Finally, reddish- purple from edge inward.

    Zinc: Pronounced interveinal chlorosis and bronzing of leaves.

    Calcium: Emergence of primary leaves delayed. Terminal buds deteriorate. Color change in upper leaves. Terminal bud dies.

    Boron: Leaves near growing point yellowed. Growth bud appears as white or light

    brown dead tissue. Terminal bud remains alive.

    Sulphur: Leaves, including veins, turn pale green to yellow--young leaves first.

    Iron: Leaves yellow to almost white; interveinal chlorosis to leaf tip.

    Magnesium: Leaves yellowish-gray or reddish-gray with green veins.

    Copper: Young leaves uniformly pale yellow--may wilt and wither without chlorosis.

    Chlorine: Wilting of upper leaves--then chlorosis.

    Molybdenum: Young leaves wilt and die along margins.

    From:Iris Society nutrient deficiencies page
    Other links about plant macro and micro nutrients:

    Micronutrients




    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  3. #19
    homer's Avatar
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    Angry

    I don't feed the plant. It just gets light and distilled water. Some of the dew-less lower leaves turn brown and die (sometimes getting gray mold on the leaves before I prune them). Maybe this mold decided to infest the new leaves? That was my initial thought, but why then didn't it infest the existing leaves you see in my recent post?


    PinguiculaMan, any suggestions for a simple method to feed this plant? Any particular bug or fertilizer you suggest??

    I just noticed that a young offshoot has a leaf that is brown along the edges... it seems this problem develops on one side of a newly forming leaf and spreads from there...

    -Homer

  4. #20
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Homer,

    I would get a small container of "Freeze-dried bloodworms", tropical fish food. I take a very small pinch between thumb and forefinger and holding it a few inches obove the plant, then rub your fingers together to crush them to powder and let a little of the powder drift down so a little of it falls on a single leaf. Bloodworms are the larvae of certain species of mosquito and are 50% protein (nitrogen). Doing this I have noticed marked improvement in just a few weeks. Sometimes under very high humidity the bloodworm particles can develop mold, however, so far this has not caused any problems. When they do I just wash them off with a spritz of water. I only feed one leaf at a time and wait until several new leaves form before I repeat the feeding with a new leaf.

    I do augment my bloodworm feeding with a very dilute spritz with a trace element solution. One called Peters S.T.E.M. (Soluble Trace Element Mixture) should suffice. Remember, very dilute.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  5. #21

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    I recently purchased a digital camera and I have taken some pics of my schizandra. I have not found this plant to be difficult to grow, although it is a very slow grower. Under very humid conditions, the roots will even grow over the surface of the medium of NZ sphagnum. I grow the plants outdoors year-round in a terrarium in bright light with no direct sun, although the plants would probably grow even bigger with more shade.
    The first pic is of a 5-6in shizandra. The third pic shows the fuzzy surface roots of this plant along with plantlets started from leaf cutting. The fourth pic is of shows plantlets from leaf cutting.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/cp2k/images/Michael's%20CP%20048.jpg[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/cp2k/images/Michael's%20CP%20037.jpg[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/cp2k/images/Michael's%20CP%20049.jpg[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/cp2k/images/Michael's%20CP%20034.jpg[/img]

  6. #22
    homer's Avatar
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    Question

    Very nice pictures! Well, my schizandra's leaves are no longer rotting - at the moment. looks like a good misting, cutting off the dead leaves, and changing the tank water did the trick. I've go my eye on them still.... not out of the woods yet I fear.

    -Homer

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