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Thread: Drosera schizandra

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Here are before and after photos of my solitary Drosera schizandra plant.

    Before was just a few weeks ago; after is today. Difference is I started spritzing its leaves with the same fertilizer solution I use on most of my other CP and I took it out of its dim corner and put it into the same ziploc (sealed plastic bag) that its new companion plant (a Drosera falconeri) has been enjoying all along. Very high light levels too (within about 2 inches (5 cm) of multiple 40 watt fluorescent lights). What a difference.

    Before:

    After:

    Companion plant:
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-13-2014 at 08:53 PM. Reason: Repair image links
    Joseph Clemens
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    Joseph,

    Thanks for your observations on your experiments regarding this species, which very much contradict "established" advice for growing this species.

    I feel compelled to add my own experiences. I have found that any drops of water sitting on the leaves of my plants have invariably rotted the leaves, and I was wondering how you would account for this?

    Also you mention foliar fertilizing, but you haven't stated what fertilizer you have used, or the dilution which you employ. Could you provide us with these details (and bear in mind most growers do not use a TDS meter so stating dilutions based on PPM would not be communicative to most.)

    Since this is a fairly rare and expensive plant in collections, I would hate to see anyone lose their plants as a result of failing to duplicate your success with your experimental protocol.

    What works for one set of growing conditions may not work in a different set.

    As you know, the success or failure of a cultivated plant depends on balancing all the factors found in cultivation, so please give your speculations.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Well, this is it:

    Once called Peters All Purpose Fertilizer with trace elements, it is now called, Jack's Classic 20-20-20

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I feel compelled to add my own experiences. *I have found that any drops of water sitting on the leaves of my plants have invariably rotted the leaves, and I was wondering how you would account for this?
    My guess would be that it is possibly some organism, either in the water or on the leaf surface acting in conjunction with the O2 level or temperature to attack the leaf tissues. -----Possibly the water is leaching out the minute amounts of nutrients that are supporting the health of the leaf and it is not pathological at all, just environmental nutrient difficiency.

    I spread it out on a white sheet of paper (it is blue with dye). I then take the amount that would cover the eraser on the end of a regular wooden pencil (about 1/4 inch or 8 mm in diameter). A little less would be a safer choice. This would be a single layer of the crystals only, not a mound. Dissolve this in a 1/2 liter (about 1 pint) of very pure distilled water. This should make a solution that is about 60-80ppm of the fertilizer minerals only.

    I use a one or two ounce, tiny atomizer, to lightly (very lightly) mist the leaves of nearly all of my CP once or twice per day while they are in active growth. If I miss a day or two sometimes, and I do. Then I don't worry about it. For the Drosera schizandra I have been giving it the fertilizer only about once every 3-4 days.

    I am also keeping the plant in a sealed ziploc plastic bag with just enough moisture to keep the Sphagnum growing well. They are very close to cool white fluorescent lights on for about 15 hours/day. It is planted in a tiny 2 inch square plastic pot, with a layer of redwood bark covering the drainage holes, then is a layer of small white pumice pieces, and then the plant is planted in a layer of living Sphagnum.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-13-2014 at 09:36 PM. Reason: Update link and info about fertilizer
    Joseph Clemens
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    I guess we'll see what happens after some more time. If this keeps working, I will put all my lowland plants outside(single didgits today in F temp) and put all dormancy plants into full growth and try to put all tropicals dormant, lol.
    So the D. falconeri is that deep red, because it's within two inches of 40W cool whites?

    Joe

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    I think the clonal variety has a lot to do with the color in D. falconeri. I grow 2 clones, including the one Pinguiculaman shows in the photo, but only this one attains this deep red coloration. Mine gets this color some distance from the light tubes, which is surprising to me, since my other clone is close under the 1000 watt HID lamps but is far less red.

    Griffin, Errr, don't be giving Joseph any more ideas! Besides, I think he has already broken most of these rules as well. LOL.

    Thanks for defining your methods better Joseph, and keep up the good work. Seriously, experimentation should be made regarding much of the cherished dogma of growing CP.

    A partial list of my friends accomplishments:

    Growing Mexican Pinguicula and tuberous Drosera wet year round and without regard for dormancy.

    Growing Sarracenia without any concerns for dormancy.

    Propagation of D. falconeri and D. regia from leaf cuttings.

    Taking root cuttings, rhizome cuttings and making transplants any time without regard for season.

    Propagation of Sarracenia from 1/8 inch rhizome slices.

    Aquatic storage of Sarracenia rhizomes and pygmy Drosera rosettes.

    Reproduction of Drosera leaf cuttings in pure water.

    Growing and storing Dionaea muscipula as aquatics.

    Reproduction of Ping leaf cuttings with no need of substrate.

    You won't find this info. in the Savage Bible! Experimentation is it's own reward ;-)



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    Question

    Well, I changed the conditions my schizandra have been growing in: higher water level, weekly top watering (while avoiding getting the leaves wet). New leaves on the parent plant are growing nicely, but more interesting is the fact that some plantlets are growing from roots and leaves that are in contact with the soil. All this activity never happened until I started giving it more water. Just some food for thought...

    -Homer

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    This seems to be the case with my plants as well. I wonder though if more dryness might encourage the plant to concentrate less on offsetting, and more into adding to its bulk size? Since I sent Joseph his plant, I am sure that we have the same clone. I will experiment a little I think with a smaller plant. Although I have not noticed any root compromise using my wet protocol, I may have missed something. I have a lot of speculations to account for the waxing and sudden waneing that I have had so many other growers mention to me. I think that the roots are intended to begin active growth during the wet season in habitat, but that as the season progresses, the substrate there becomes progressively drier. This is when the roots would toughen, and cease to elongate. If the substrate is too wet at this time the new roots might be affected. SO, it is likely to be a seasonal cycle of wet/dry that will prevent the plant from losing the gains it has made. I just have to find out how to easily check which mode the plant is in. I doesn't like being knocked about so I cant just pop out the root ball like I can with most other species. I just have to pay more attention to the plants growth. Its hard to keep track of all the minutae of these details in my collection, but I will try to concentrate on this species in the coming weeks.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] SO, it is likely to be a seasonal cycle of wet/dry that will prevent the plant from losing the gains it has made.
    I would have never thought of that. I assumed that since the plants grow naturally in the rain forest that there would be no wet/dry season. But, sure enough, I researched the weather patterns of Cairns, Australia (relatively close to Mt. Bartle Frere) and there is a distinct wet/dry period. Of course the rainfall patterns, etc will vary between these two places. The summers are the wet season and the winters dry. So... my question is how I should apply this to my cultivation method.

    Currently, the photoperiod ranges from 16 hours summer to 12 winter. Right now, its at 12.5, thus close to winter and therefore putting it at the start of the dry season. I, however, have been giving it more water the past few weeks with good results. The "good results" is what matters.

    My plan is: continue to keep the water level high and top water until next fall (to recover from the dew-less leaves episode), then I will start to lessen the water level at slow increments to coincide with lower photoperiod.

    At the moment, I should be happy I didn't lose the plant when the leaves lost all their dew (and never came back), and kept moving the plant around.

    -Homer

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