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Thread: Drosera graminifolia Diamantina

  1. #17
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Orchid bark is nearly always either fir or pine, more often the former rather than the latter. This reference is to bark from Sequoia trees, (its appearance is much more fibrous than most other tree barks, one brand name was "Palco Wool") it was being marketed for use in orchid culture, usually as a minor ingredient in fir bark orchid media to reduce the rate at which the fir bark decomposes under orchid culture conditions. It is very strongly acidic and has strong microbe inhibiting properties.

    A few vendors of orchid supplies still carry it, though it is much more expensive than it was 25 years ago when I bought a pallet load from the manufacturer (J.T. Dimmick out of Garberville, CA). For instance here is a link to one suppliers site:
    Hummert's listing for the redwood bark discussed in this thread



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    So , is the best place to get redwood bark you local Home Depot type area(ie, mulch)?

    Thanks,

    Joe

  3. #19
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I have never seen actual redwood bark other than that available from orchid supply vendors, though I have looked diligently for several decades now. If anyone does, please let me know, thanks.

    The "fiberized redwood bark" I use and supplied Tamlin with is just this: Dimmick's Fiberized Redwood Bark

    I wish I had a financial interest in this supplier, but I don't. I obtained my supply when it was about 1/3 the current price. Perhaps other materials will provide similar benefits, but I cannot vouch for this to be the case, you will need to perform your own experiments to determine this if you choose to use alternate materials.

    I discovered these interesting abilities of redwood bark almost by accident.

    1st; I had been growing orchids for several years before I learned of CP, and redwood bark was being used as an additive to basic fir bark for orchid culture, to slow the decomposition of the fir bark.

    2nd; While on a trip outside my local area of Southern Califonria I purchased a Sarracenia purpurea plant and discovered it was planted in 100% redwood bark. The light went on and I contacted the manufacturer for information on the composition and characteristics as concerns using it for plant culture.

    3rd; I purchased a pallet load from the manufacturer, deliverd by truck to my home, now in Washington state, pacific northwest.

    4th; I was growing my many Sarracenia species and hybrids in gallon size pots or larger, and for convenience as well as to support my laziness, I had them floating in plastic wading pools of purified water, augmented by rain water. Sometimes the LFS they were planted in would turn "sour" rot rapidly and smell like sewage, often killing the plant growing therein. I extrapolated that perhaps the redwood bark (which was not being utilized at this time) might help reduce this tendency as the manufacturers laboratory analysis indicated that it had substantial anti-microbial properties. I simply placed a fist-full or two under the rootball of each floating plant and almost never had this issue again.




    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #20

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    Looks like great stuff. If I could walk in and buy a bag, I would. Roughly 1$/pound in the midwest is a good price, actually.

    Regards,

    Joe

  5. #21
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Here is some additional info about Redwood Bark in a quote from this link: http://www.disas.com/con1999-12.htm BTW, Disa orchids are terrestrial and sympatric (grow side-by-side in the same environment) with Drosera capensis and other South African CP:

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]4. Redwood bark
    Several California orchid growers, and Disa growers specifically, have had great success using shredded redwood bark in their medium for Disa cultivation. Redwood is well known for its excellent resistance to decay, and John Larimer prompted me to find out what constituents were responsible. So I contacted a chemist who specialises in natural products, and this is what he came up with: "It's the oils. Redwoods, cedars and others contain a complex mix of terpenes, propylphenol and propylphenol ethers (lignites). Many have antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant properties." Maybe these oils in the bark help Disa plants by keeping root rotting fungi at bay. The oils are presumably also a major factor in why redwood burns so easily.
    That's all for this issue.
    Check out this link about the culture of Disa orchids, doesn't it sound familiar?
    Disa Orchid Culture



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  6. #22

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    Disa orchids have very similar cultivation requirements to CPs; soil, light, water etc.

    I first saw them in the flesh (foliage? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]) at Kew Gardens growing together in the same greenhouse as CPs and knew then I had to try some. I've been growing both a red and a yellow-flowered form of D. uniflora for about five months now without problems, I can't wait for them to flower, hopefully this summer. I don't use any bark chips in the compost, just NZ LFS and perlite, with a live sphagnum top.

    This is one of the the D. uniflora at Kew that first caught my attention, stunning little orchids.



    Cheers

    Vic
    They say that money talks, but all it ever says to me is goodbye.

  7. #23
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    BTW, Tamlin,

    Thanks for sharing about your Drosera graminifolia. I too have now shifted my plant into the same culture I use for the Drosera regia. Sure would be nice to get flowers and some viable seed from this beautiful plant.




    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  8. #24

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    Hi fellow CPers.. I am now back, after some time and surprisingly i find this when i am trying to grow some D.graminifolia seedlings.

    Someone here, maybe Tamlin or PinguiculaMan, can tell me of a good replacement for redwood here where i live?? (Colombia)

    Kind regards, and i am really happy to be back here.

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