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Thread: D. adelae - Papery leaves

  1. #9

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    Hi Seattleguy2,

    First off, welcome to Terra Forums!

    Regarding the work of Pinguiculaman in editing your posts, please don't take it personally: Joseph frequently edits my spelling as well, and I appreciate it. Joseph worked for many years as an editor, so these things are second nature to him.

    Proper spelling of the binomials is to be encouraged among members who are hopefully reagrded as friends: it's all part of the education process that these Forums offer. It takes a lot of effort to edit all these posts, so please don't be offended! You are , of course, entitled to spell as poorly as you like and I am sure that Joseph will offer no further correction unless asked ;-)

    In regards to your question, if you are using pure mineral free water, and keeping them very moist at all times, then this might just be part of the growth cycle these plants experience. Individual rosettes in my collection, mature, flower and die off, and seem relatively short lived compared to other species. Do your plants flower?

    Most of your conditions sound good for this species. LFS is a fairly pure medium, but it is also very low in micronutrients. Perhaps the addition of some rinsed peat/sand to the mix will afford something that is missing presently. Even though these plants grow in nutrient deficient conditions, nutrients are still needed. Being a woodland species, I am sure that rain falling through the canopy of trees also delivers some nourishment to the plants.

    I have not found them to be as light demanding as other Drosera species. One issue though: do you regularly change your light tubes? These become less effective over time: 8 months max. Mine grow best in cool conditions, and I keep mine very wet, although other growers seem to have success with other methods as well.

    Why not experiment? Take some of the offsets, and use a different protocol: different people have different experiences in growing these plants. No single set of conditions applies broad spectrum accross the board. Try a different substrate, perhaps less humid, more light, more feeding, warmer temps. In other words, if what you're doing isn't working for you, try something else. Once you hit on an optimal combination, stick with it.

    You are fortunate that this species is so common and prolific in it's offsetting. If you lose this species, it is easily replaced. Sometimes it seems like whatever I do is wrong when cultivating an unfamiliar species! The thing is to choose one set of variables, and alter just that: be attentive and observe the results. If it fails, change another set.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #10
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Seattleguy2,

    I have grown many Drosera adelae for several decades now. Mine have often "cycled" between growing very well and nearly dying back to stunted runts. So far, in every instance this has happened it was related to mite or thrips attacks.

    Spider mite, cyclamen mite, or thrips can quickly cause this kind of damage but are hard to observe when doing their dirtywork. Careful observation, under magnification, of the lower surface of any remaining live leaf parts will usually reveal the culprits. Even under magnification with a hand lens they are still difficult to see, if the culprits are cyclamen mites - they are so small and transparent they are nearly impossible to see. 15X magnification with a loupe is about the least that provides sufficient magnification for spider mites or thrips identification. A few drops of "cinnamon oil" in about 2 ounces of water sprayed on every plant surface usually does the trick if repeated several times over a period of 7 days.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  3. #11

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    I was supposed to get a leaf of this species as well as a N.x ventrata,and P. x `weser') about 1 1\2 months ago ,but havent recieved them yet,did vertigo die or something?[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  4. #12
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Following are photographic illustrations of what spider mites can do to Drosera adelae:

    Web Page with spider mite photos

    Here is a photo of an affected pot of Drosera adelae:


    And here are some close-ups of the culprits themselves hiding in the hairs on the undersides of Drosera adelae leaves:



    Another technique that works well if you are more patient is to trim off all stems and leaves with sharp scissors (dispose of them) and then to submerge the entire pot under water for several days to a week, before treating it normally and awaiting the flush of new growth that will then happen from the pot full of roots.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  5. #13

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    Thanks Tamlin, PinguiculaMan and others who responded. Spider mite/bugs in general haven't been a problem for me yet (thank god!), but I did try topping two of my pots of plants grown in LFS with a peat/sand carnie mix to see if the added nutrients that are washed down help a bit. And in response to Tamlin, no, they haven't flowered yet...they get to about the size the would, then die back. The rest of my collection grows quite happily, except for D. adelae (<---note, correct binomial spelling), which has this wierd cycle thing going on.
    Joe G.

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