User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: D.capensis 'rubra'

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    237
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hello,

    I got a plant in trade a year ago labelled D.capensis 'rubra', I am really not sure that the difference between this and typical is? It is starting to flower and I would like to find out if their is truly a rubra version before I start handing out seed.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    BobZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arcata, California
    Posts
    1,230
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The red form of D. capensis is more red than other D. capensis. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]
    AFAIK it has not been formally described as a variety or cultivar, at least not yet in the ICPS database.

    As with any variety, form, or cultivar, a plant with particular characteristics does not necessarily breed true and produce seedlings with identical characteristics. D. 'Albino' (capensis "alba") was found to breed true and produce seedlings that also have a complete lack of anthocyanins including white flowers. I expect that the red form of capensis has an excess of anthocyanins that result in the red coloration. But whether all seedlings retain the heavy red coloration or produce offspring having a range of color needs to be verified before you distribute seed as D. capensis "red" or "rubra".

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The plant in question is the subject of a recent post here:

    http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....;t=9814

    I have not yet grown a crop of seed grown plants to assess how the seedlings will compare to the parent plants, but all the small seedlings I received produced identical mature plants, so I assume the characteristics are stable.

    I still think this is a possible hybrid with D. affinis. Although my source was uncertain as to the origins of his plants, they were sent to me as Drosera capensis x rubra, which seems to imply some possible hybrid involvement. This is supported by the significant differences with other forms of D. capensis in cultivation.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  4. #4
    larry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,724
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I obtained some D. capensis "red" seeds from Noah a while ago. I have several seedlings growing. Some look like normal capensis while others are much redder. Unfortunately, they aren't getting much sun right now, so they all look like the typical capensis. But come spring, I expect to see a big change. I'll be weeding out the non red ones [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    larry
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigflytrap/
    Save a tree, legalize cannabis.
    Be enlightened

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    237
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the info, I will put it under more intense light and see if it darkens up. If it produces seeds I will let you know as to how they turn out also.

    Andre

  6. #6
    BobZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arcata, California
    Posts
    1,230
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Information such as Tamlin's and Larry's is important to document. If the plant's genotype is stable and seed replicates the special characteristics (such as with D. 'Albino'), then distribution of seed is good. However, if the seed produces seedlings ranging from typical to red, then the distribution of such seed should be discouraged, unless it is explicitly understood that only a few offspring might retain the intense red coloration.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That is a good point Bob. Also, growers should be aware that there are at least a couple of all red D. capensis clones floating about. Noah's plants are different from the "rubra" variety, and similar in form to the wide leaved form of D. cpaensis. The rubra that Pingiculaman received from me is quite different in many respects.

    I suggest that the name "rubra" be reserved for the plants discussed in Joseph's post on the subject, as listed above. Ther eis potential here for a great deal of future confusion.

    This is one name that needs to be registered I think.
    I recently sent seed to Mark Wilson, who has reported germination. It will be interesting to learn how his crop turns out. If it breeds true from seed, then I will submit the name for publication and later international registry.
    "Grow More, Share More"

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •