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Thread: Drosera sessilifolia

  1. #9
    noah's Avatar
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    Hi,

    D. sessilifolia propagates extensively through seed. The main difference between sessilifolia is their native location: at almost opposite ends of the globe. D. sessilifolia grows in south America, while D. burmannii is native to Australia.

    In habit D. sessilifolia is generally much redder in coloration. It is also more compact than many D. burmannii clones. Thirdly, I find the undersides of D. sessilifolia laminas to be much more glaborous than those of D. burmannii.

    D. burmannii compared to D. sessilifolia:


  2. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Thirdly, I find the undersides of D. sessilifolia laminas to be much more glaborous than those of D. burmannii.
    Hey Noah,

    I disagree. To my eye, the undersides of D. sessilifolia lamina look hairy, or pubescent, if you prefer. The D. burmannii from Beerwah, QLD have lamina with nearly glabrous undersides, but not quite; they still possess a few fine hairs. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

  3. #11
    noah's Avatar
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    Hi Forbes,

    Woops! You are quite correct. There I go mixing up my terms again... my bad.

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    For further elucidation, here's what Fernando posted to the CP liserve regarding this species:


    Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 11:37:21 PST
    From: "Fernando Rivadavia Lopes"
    To: cp@opus.hpl.hp.com
    Subject: Re: Drosera sessilifolia
    Message-ID: <19990129193728.25958.qmail@hotmail.com>


    To Matt and Jan,


    >Without a flower, I guess no human being will be able to tell these
    >two species apart (if they are not labeled, of course).

    Well Jan, there is at least one human capable of telling them
    apart without flowers: ME! And I believe my good friend Ivan Snyder in
    L.A. (the one who hybridized both species) may be even better than
    myself, since he has to tell them apart in cultivation, when
    D.sessilifolia is usually rather small and puny for some reason.

    It's true they are VERY similar species, but they're not too
    hard to differentiate in cultivation when you have the common form of
    D.burmannii. I've seen some odd forms of D.burmannii from N Australia
    which had quite weird leaf shapes and very red leaves. These may be a
    bit more confusing. Basically, the leaves of D.burmannii are more
    triangular and those of D.sessilifolia more rounded. The leaves (or
    tentacles) of the latter are also usually more reddish or pinkish. If
    they flower, you'll see erect scapes with pink flowers on D.sessilifolia
    and ascending scapes with white flowers in D.burmannii (although I've
    seen forms of this species with erect scapes and I think I've at least
    heard of pink flowered specimens too).

    Having just seen D.sessilifolia in the wild again, I've
    gained a few new insights into this curious species, or at least
    hypothesis. Me and a few others have noticed that in cultivation
    D.sessilifolia is always a miniature of what the parent plants looked
    like in the wild, never growing very large. When I found them N of Boa
    Vista last week, I noticed they were growing only in a small area near a
    road, where there were some houses, and where horses and cows
    occasionally passed by. Yet while exploring further away along the
    river, Gert and I could find no signs of D.sessilifolia, although there
    were apparently many good habitats.

    So what is going through my mind at the moment is that
    D.sessilifolia may need some kind of fertilizer to grow, both in the
    wild (from animal droppings) and in cultivation. It would be interesting
    to test this in cultivation, adding different types of fertilizer to see
    how big the plants get. If it is true tha D.sessilifolia likes areas
    fertilized by animal droppings, then we can speculate that
    D.sessilifolia was VERY common until a few thousand years ago, back
    before the natives dined on the last mammoths, giant ground sloths, and
    other extinct S.American megafauna species. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    Best Wishes,

    Fernando Rivadavia
    Sao Paulo, Brazil

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    Here's a picture of a D. burmannii from Beerwah, QLD growing next to the D. sessilifolia. This location of D. burmannii usually is completely green; see the second picture for plants growing under less light.

    BTW, thanks for the plants, Larry. I'm glad I figured out that you use undrained containers... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]

    [img]http://home.**********.com/forbes/D.burmanniiBeerwahQLD.JPG[/img]

    [img]http://home.**********.com/forbes/images/D.%20burmannii%20Beerwah.JPG[/img]

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    The differences between both species are truly very fine, suggesting they probably should be lumped into a single species. And the fact that their hybrids are fertile adds some support to this idea. Their geographic distribution, however, is very odd for a single species...

    The claimed differences are usually those observed between cultivated clones, but the truth is that if you compare wild populations then things become more confusing.

    For example leaf color. Both species are usually very red in sunny wild sites, although D.sessilifolia APPEARS to retain this coloration better in cultivation.

    The flowers are pink in D.sessilifolia and usually white in D.burmannii, although I have heard of pink ones. The flower scapes are USUALLY ascending in D.burmannii and erect in D.sessilifolia. The lamina is also USUALLY more triangular in D.burmannii, but there's also some variation there...

    So basically, these 2 are very closely related, although geographically distant.

    Good luck (and congrats on the nice plants!)
    Fernando Rivadavia

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Yes, Drosera sessilifolia is just as delightful a sundew as Drosera burmannii.





    I wouldn't be at all surprised if these two "species" had already gotten mixed up in cultivation. Mine have been growing adjacent to each other and I do not trust myself to positively identify volunteer seedlings, so I have taken to starting fresh colonies from my original germplasm material which I will then maintain in isolation from each other.




    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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