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Thread: Pygmy Summer Survival Tips...

  1. #9
    Capslock's Avatar
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    Hey, I've received many gemmae for pygmies this year, and am somewhat ignorant about the differences. Could anyone (Tamlin?) list what are some of the more summer-sensitive species?

    And when exactly should I start letting them dry out more? Is it really "summer" or when the white stipules appear?

    Capslock
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  2. #10

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    Capslock,
    The stipules are a good indicator.

    Odysseus,
    I have not found my D. pulchella to experience summer dormancy. This one stays wet year round for me. Regarding the photoperiod, no reduction is needed, since these species go dormant during the longer days of summer. I doubt that if grown under lights there would be any danger from "burn". I would keep them a little less wet, but be observant and if you note growth, put them back wetter cultivation. Often my plants will rest a bit after the gemmae season is done, before resuming growth.In my conditions, the real dormancy issues usually begin sometime in July.

    Sensitive species (in my conditions or by repute) include: Drosera pycnoblasta, occidentalis, pygmaea, androsacea, silvicola, manni, citrina, nivea, lasiantha, miniata, platystigma, closterostigma, dichrosepala, enodes, sargentii, spilos. I am sure I am forgetting some. Seandew might be able to add more.
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    Posting this dormant D. pycnoblasta mostly as a test. Most species don't form as dramatic a stipular cone as this one:


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    Odysseus's Avatar
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    Thanks, Tamlin. My plants have grown the white stipules and then flowered. After they flowered the existing leaves died off. I thought I let them dry out a little, so I watered. I will have to wait to see if it was water loss shock or what you are describing as dormancy. Thanks for the info.
    Odysseus
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    I can add a few to Tamlins list of sensitive species. I will also say that many species that may grow very easily for one person may prove difficult for another. Pygmy Drosera occur in a vast range of different microclimates. Generally, those that grow in environments that are moist for most of the year are considered the easier species to grow. Species in this group would be D. pulchella, D. nitidula ssp. nitidula, D. ericksoniae and D. pygmaea among others.

    Many species grow in habitats that experience very dry and hot conditions for part of the year. Species from these areas could be described as the sensitive species. These plants have extremely long roots that extend far enough to reach the moisture deep in the soil, even when the soil surface is bone dry. These plants will cease growth in Summer and survive (if they are lucky) with the aid of a stipule bud. If you wish to grow these species successfully you must emulate these natural conditions. To do so, just follow the technique that Tamlin described. The plants can be kept in a water tray in Winter but in late Spring they should be removed and placed in a free draining position. Every few days, or when the pot feels light and therefore dry, place the pot in a water tray and let it soak up water for 5-10 minutes. The aim is to moisten the growing mix without letting the surface become wet. I use this technique and my plants never have a problem.

    Species that I would include in the sensitive group are- D. pycnoblasta, androsacea, barbigera, miniata, eneabba, nivea, citrina, rechingeri, closterostigma, silvicola, spilos, platystigma, hyperostigma, echinoblastus, leioblasta and a few others.

    Funnily enough. some of the species that Tamlin lists as sensitive species grow very well for me without becoming dormant at all over Summer and reamin in the water tray all year. These species are D. mannii, dichrosepala, enodes, pygmaea, occidentalis and lasiantha. This is not to say that these plants would not be considered sensitive species in the collections of others. Perhaps I just have the ideal conditions to grow them in. After all, I do live in southern Australia

    One of the peculiarities of pygmy Drosera is that species that grow really well for one person can be extremely difficult for another, even in what may appear to be identical conditions.

    Sean.

  6. #14
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    How about D. stelliflora?

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    My Drosera paleacea ssp. stelliflora remain in the watertray all year and do not undergo a dormant period. I find this species very easy to grow well.

    Sean.

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