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Thread: D. burmannii flower puzzle

  1. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (PlantAKiss @ Mar. 31 2004,12:00)]I originally had one D. burmannii plant. It grew well, got quite large, produced several flower scapes, made seed and eventually died off. I collected seed and also there were volunteers in the pot so I transplanted several of those and now have a pot bursting with about 5 burmanniis. They are all starting to produce scapes in various stages.

    The largest scape and a couple of others have matured and are setting seed. When I went to check on the seed I noticed something. The largest plant had a large flower scape with WHITE flowers (made sure by looking through a magnifying glass) and the spent flowers were light brown. All the other plants that had (or have) flowers are PINK. Clearly pink..even the spent flowers are pink.

    So...my question is...is it unusual to get both white and pink flowers out of the same batch of seed from one single plant? Is one color more typical than the other? Unfortunately I do not recall the flower color of the original burmanii plant. Would seed from the white flowered scape give white flowered plants and vice versa with the pink?

    All the plants are definitely D. burmannii and I had no sessilifolia at the time the original plant flowered.

    If anyone has any comments I'd sure appreciate it. Thanks!

    Suzanne
    ressesive genes and basic mendelin at that, it's easy. Your origenal plant had one dominent pink gene and one resessive colorless gene. It self fertilised. So 1/4 of the plants have two genes for pink. 1/2 have one pink gene and one white so they express the pink trait and 1/4 have two ressesive white genes and have white flowers. So yah, one plant can throw two colors, more if it has complex color genes, but your description sounds like the easy yes or no type

    Edit: The origenal mutation could have taken place at a lot of places. You only need the flowerstalk to mutate in order for seed to hold the mutation.

    If your origenal plant had white flowers, then it's not basic medilain genetics, but a dominent color inhibitor gene. That is to say an when the dominent form of an unrelated gene is pressent it sits on the gene for pinkness and prevents it from expressing. When this dominent suppressive gene is replaced by two ressesive alleals the pink color is no longer prevented from forming and the pink comes through. This however would give you more white then pink flowers.

    The third option is that if you started with white flowers, and the pink was suppressed by having two ressesive alleals of another gene pressent, then having one dominent version of the suppressive gene would be enough to let the color through. And of course, you could have a gene that sits on a gene that would have sat on the color gene if it hadn't been sat on it'self.... okay getting to complex now LOL.

    Short answer is, yes, it happens. And I have seen both color types up for grabs in the traiding post. You just lucked out and got a two for one deal
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  2. #10
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hi Jim

    Yes, that's probably about the size of them. And yes they are well under a year old. When they start to grow, they grow very fast! One minute they were little seedlings and the next the pot was getting full. Really amazing. D. burmannii is one of my favorites. Its a very handsome, wicked little 'dew with its long tentacles and "catcher's mitts."

    Sean...probably. I'll have to check and see what else is blooming too.

    Thanks Darcie. Ummm..."And of course, you could have a gene that sits on a gene that would have sat on the color gene if it hadn't been sat on it'self..." HUH??
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #11
    larry's Avatar
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    Hey Suzanne, where did you get that first burmannii? Wasn't from me was it? If it was, then it would explain the pink flowers
    larry
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  4. #12
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    No actually my original plant came from William. You have pink flowered burmannii also? Did it make both white and pink flowers off the same parent plant?
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    BobZ's Avatar
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    Interesting discussion. Suzanne, I also received some burmanni and/or sessilifolia from William, not directly, but as an unannounced bonus that sprouted in various Utrics that he sent to me. I had just assumed that the ones with pink flowers were sessilifolia and the ones with white flowers were burmanni. Since I had neither species, they could not have been a contaminate from my plants.

  6. #14
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hmmm...that's interesting Bob. I do have some pink flowered sessilifolia that came from William (on purpose!). But I can easily tell them apart although probably seedlings would probably be more difficult.

    I'll have to ask William if he's noticed pink flowers on his burmannii. I told him about my flowers and he said D. burmannii had white flowers as far as he knew.

    I'll have to tell him you got some little hitchhikers in your utrics. I like gettting little bonuses like that.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Nope, my burmannii have white flowers. But since it came from William, and he grows sessilifolia...
    larry
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  8. #16

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    Hmmm... So the pink-colored inflorescences have pink flowers while the green inflorescences have white flowers? Sounds like you have some albino plants versus regular colored plants.

    The problem is that the leaves appear to belong to D.burmannii, and not D.sessilifolia. And as far as I know D.burmannii only very rarily has pinkish flowers (although pinkish scapes and plants are common). It would be interesting to ask the person who sent you the seeds about the origin of this plant...

    Fernando Rivadavia

    P.S. If you can get pics of the open flowers, I'd be really interested in seeing them...

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