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Thread: Different forms of D.spatulata

  1. #1

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    As there are several different forms of D.spatulata around, I thought it would be a good idea to see all of them in one topic. If you like this idea post pictures of your forms of spatulata here.

    I will start with pics of the 3 forms i now have as adults:

    A form I got as In-Vitro culture of unknown origin:




    A form I got as D.sp 'Auyan Tepui' and turned out to be D.spatulata:



    And finally, a form from Mt.Hudson, Gt.Barrier Is in New Zealand:



    Hope you like it!!

    Sebastian Vieira

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    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Here are a couple pics of mine. This one is labeled as spat AWC-1 that I got from Copper. (thanks Rose )


    Enjoy






    Steve
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Does anybody know which type "Little Pot Of Horrors" supplies to places like Home Depot?

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    Nice photos Seb! As to different forms, man is that an understatement! I can't believe the variability that is lumped under this species! Reviewing the various key descriptions for the various species throughout the world, it is difficult for me to accept that all these forms should be regarded as one species since the details of nearly every stucture commonly used to differentiate one species from another are different in different populations. Still, geographic isolation can cause some remarkable evolutionary changes, and considering that the plants are island dwellers (and many with an alpine tendency) maybe I shouldn't be so surprised at the demonstration of different phenotypes.

    AS an aside, the AWC1 designation is mine, part of my numbering system in my collection. This lets me know the origin of the material, in this case from a commercial interest that mistakenly marketed this as Drosera communis for many years.

    I no longer keep a website per se, but photos of my plants may be seen at the following links:

    http://206.103.248.175/tamlin_post/p...ta_AWM-1_r.jpg

    http://206.103.248.175/tamlin_....wer.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._3r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....03r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._5r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....r2r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._3r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._2r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._7r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....r_r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....3_1.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....r1r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....o8r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....a2r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._1r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._1r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF....s_r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._1r.jpg

    http://www.sherlock-droserae.com/UploadF...._1r.jpg

    Note that D. spatulata "Suzy Q" is an invalid name at present, although this should soon be rectified. Drosera 'Tamlin' should be published any day now, and may be seen as legitimate. All letter and numerical designations are for my personal reference, are invalid, and probably best not used outside of my immediate circle. I wouldn't want to create any confusion, and I see these designations appearing here and there as the plants I have shared spread throughout the world.

    Of all the forms of D. spatulata, I am most attracted to the white flowered New Zealand forms. Bruce Salmon addresses these plants admirably in his book "Carnivorous plants of New Zealand" , and from what I have seen of it it is highly recommended. The New Zealand alpine forms are more difficult in my cultivation, but very beautiful plants. I think my favorite is the less red colored plants from the Ahipara gumfields.

    The examples from Borneo are usually smaller, and with very unique features. The "sp. Borneo" plants in circulation also have extremely glandular retentive glands for most of their length, and only a few flowers on a short and thin scape. I also grow a form from Bako, Borneo with similar features.

    Then there are the larger, white flowered forms (of which D. 'Tamlin' is one) from Australia with their higher ploidy counts. These are also very beautiful, having a rich orange rust coloration. D. "lovellae" is one of these types, although I have been cautioned by my mentors that the name is best abandoned since the research regarding the original collection of this type ( a single collection) was "dodgy at best". Plants from Fraiser Island (forgive my spelling if I have it wrong) is of a similar type.

    D. spatulata has the rep of being a common plant, but I can tell you, it is none the less a beautiful and interesting species, full of surprises, and can teach a person much regarding the taxonomy of the genus in general.

    One of the most reliable defining characteristics (apart from the seed testa) is in the open reflexed nature of the seed pods after the flowers have closed. In this species, the sepals do not clasp the seed pod, but remain relexed, giving the pod a star like look when viewed from above. This is apparently a feature unique to this species, and more dependable I think than other details which are more inconsistent in different populations.

    I am not familiar with the form in Little Pot of Horrors, not having grown this plant. I seem to recall seeing a photo of it once, and it appeared to be to be the "Kansai" form that is a probable hybrid with D. rotundifolia, but I am not certain of this. The Kansai form is typified by a long narrow petiole widening at the end to a roundish lamina. The tentacles are almost exclusively confined to the traps, appearing abruptly at the end of the petiole, and not on the petiole itself.

    The plant I am most interested in at present is D. spatulata from the Gympie area in Australia, which has hairy sepals. If anyone knows a source for this, I am very interested in cultivating it.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info Tamlin. I will drop the AWC-1 tag. Do you know what type this plant actually is?

    Thanks
    Steve

    ps
    Welcome back to the forum
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

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    noah's Avatar
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    One of Ivan's creations, Drosera spatulata ‘wentworth x woroura x Gympie’:



    Here's a form I call D. spatulata "capillaris, double ovary" - that's what I got it labeled as. After growing it for a while I found that it was neither d. capillaris, nor had a double ovary. Still a nice plant, though.




    Speaking of which, I was wondering if there was a tried-and-true way to distinguish the oh-so-variable D. spatulata from D. capillaris? For example, your shots of the spatulata from Ahipara, NZ closely resemble the capillaris I grow from Tate's #### Swamp, FL:

    D._spatulata_Ahipara_NZ

    D. spatulata_Ahipara_NZ flower





    Any ideas? True, looking at labels generally works, but when seeds are mislabeled and weeds pop up here and there, it would be nice to have a clue how to ID these things.

    Thanks for any help!

    -noah

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    Add some of wild spatulata,some may reposted.




    Pictures were taken in different locations of Hong Kong,they may the same form I think

  8. #8

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    Noah,

    Very interesting plants you have there, especially that Drosera spatulata ‘wentworth x woroura x Gympie’. I assume the seed will be fertile.

    As to the question of ID, as I said above, the seed pods reflexed appearance would be the most reliable detail I think. The Tates #### plant of D. capillaris certainly does bear a striking resembelence to the Ahipara D. spatulata! I can assure you that my plants are indeed D. spatulata from the NZ populations since the original seed was field collected. I am very interested in seed from the Tate's #### type of D. capillaris, none of my seed germinated from the ICPS seedbank.

    Another good determinator is the seed testa. I think Christian has some photo's up on Bob Z's site of both species, and they are very easy to tell apart.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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