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Thread: Sundew flower stalk leaning over

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    One of my D. spatulata stalks is doing the leaning Tower of Pisa thing. It was straight up and has been steadily moving to a 45 degree angle. Does it need more light?

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (jimscott @ May 09 2004,4:17)]One of my D. spatulata stalks is doing the leaning Tower of Pisa thing. It was straight up and has been steadily moving to a 45 degree angle. Does it need more light?
    nope. I've had them grow vertically, then get so tall they topple over [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

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    Well, there is some variation even in habitat. Generally speaking, plants with enough light will be fairly straight, but conditions in cultivation are rarely as good as in nature, so some etiolation is inevitable (larger rosettes, taller and thinner scapes).

    The best indicator of sufficient light is the color of the lamina and stalked glands: if they are nice and red, then the plant is receiving good light, and this will support flowering and good seed set.
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    What are lamina?
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    no idea

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    Sorry. Here, let me put on my Professor's hat, where is the thing.......ah. Better.

    Lamina is a term used to describe the part of the leaf where the stalked glands are to be found. The other part of the leaf, where there are no glands, is termed the petiole.

    Both terms are very often used in describing Drosera species.

    Regarding the petiole, some other terms you might run into would be glaborous: meaning without hairs. So, the term "glaborous petiole" should call to mind that part of the leaf that has no stalked glands (since these are confined to the lamina), and also no hairs. The opposite would be "hirsute" or hairy: the absence or presence of hairs on the petiole reveal much in the study of this genus.
    Petioles may be straight sided, or tapering. The tapering may be gradual or abrupt. The petiole taken in cross section may be described in many different degrees as well.

    In regards to the lamina, it can have different shapes. Lamina may be round (or rotundate), as in D. rotundifolia, spathulate: shaped like a baseball bat cut in half (as in D. spathulata), truncate, terminating in a straight line, as if cut off, (e.g. D. aliciae, D. brevifolia). The qualitative terms may also be combined and modified: sub-rotund (almost round) or spathulate-obovate (widely tapering baseball bat, lol), etc.

    Lamina may be erect (as in D. intermedia)or D. venusta, prostrate (or adpressed) as in D. spatulata.

    There are many more terms, but these are some that are frequently used. Using these terms it is possible to describe many species of Drosera, and to discuss their likenesses and differences.
    Taxonomy is more than a science: it is an art! There is real beauty in someones ability to describe a plant so exactly.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Well, between Friday and Monday the stalk has now become horizontal. A second stalk is totally vertical. A third stalk has emerged. I put all my spats outside since we are now having a heat wave. I did a net search for the word tendril. Lotsa sites and verbal descriptions. One picture. The best description was one depicting a plant that had tendrils that wrapped themselves around solid objects - like a grapevine or pumpkin. Not sure what that is analogous to a CP.

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    Thanks So what are lamina in Nymphaea?
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