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Thread: Capensis

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    A bought a capensis several months ago from a local exotic plants dealer and just figured it was a "typical". I mentioned to a friend that it is now blooming and has white flowers and it was suggested that it is an 'alba'. I've seen the recent post and pic of a pink flowereing capensis, so I know that can be ruled out. What do you think?

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    BobZ's Avatar
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    Sounds like the albino capensis. The plant will self-fertilize and produce seedlings with white flowers.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thank you for the confirmation! Anybody want some 'alba' seeds in a few weeks?

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    Proper nomenclature for those so inclined would be Drosera capensis 'Albino'. a legitimately published and registered cultivar. It's too bad that the use of 'Alba' was not permissable for this cultivar's name, but "alba" is a Latinization, and ICBN regulations reserves the use of Latinizations exclusively for species publication. Most growers refer to the white flowered form as Alba, the name by which it circulated for many years before Peter D'Amato published the standard photo in "The Savage Garden" in 1989. So, to be proper, it should be called Drosera capensis 'Albino', although it probably will never be fashionable to do so.

    As many growers have noted, the name "Albino" (chosen to reflect the complete lack of anthocyanins in the plant) is not entirely accurate. There is apparently some pigmentation in the tentacles if grown under strong light.
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    True, I found that capensis "alba" (I don't care for albino) tentacles will turn pink in the about same amount light needed to get an 'All red' to colour up properly.
    With the flower scape it might be idea to cut it off so the plant put it's energy into growing, not flowering.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Too late! It is already flowering. but I will cut off subsequent stalk - if they appear. So far just more green, dewy leaves.

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    o_O Capensis don't really need to have extra energy for growth, they have plenty to begin with. People cut the flowers off so they don't have 5 million baby capensis taking over their pots usually, lol.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Is 'alba' a little more valuable or less common than 'typical'?

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