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Thread: Dewy pine germinated

  1. #1
    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
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    g

    (that's the g that did not make it in the topic desciption heading)

    I hope all goes well with my Dewy Pine. I took a good look at it today and noticed that it is starting to sprout.
    I originally placed 2 seeds in an 8" pot hoping one would germinate. Nothing happened for over 2 months, so I got another one of my seeds and placed it in the pot. That was about 2 weeks ago and like I said it's sprouting.
    I've read they can be very touchy when starting to germinate, so any help welcome. Plus when do you start to back off on the watering? How much do you usually give it? Etc, Etc....
    Thanks


    My Grow List Updated 8/24/17

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    Kay, when one of them gets two leaves, carefully use a spoon and transfer it out of the pot. From what I've seen in my limited growing, they really do seem to release some kind of chemical into the soil that will kill off other drosophyllum. I found this out the hard way when I tried to re-use a pot and soil. Coincidence? I don't think you want to risk it.

    For me, I grew it like drosera until it was much larger (8 leaves, or a few months old). Keep it damp, not sopping wet nor too dry. I put just enough water in it for the tray to get a bit wet. When it's larger you can just sort of tell that it's ready for less water. My area can be a bit windy so right now I have my plant's stem placed inbetween 4 small rocks. Every week or so, I "water the rocks" until they're wet. About a quarter cup of water.

    Honestly, I only have one plant that has survived out of maybe 10 that I planted (8 germinated). If seed doesn't sprout after a really long time - 6 months or more, you can try drying it out and germinating again. That's what I'm currently waiting for. I hope it works for my other seed.

    Well, I only know of two other drosophyllum growers, but they're both in California. In my case, my backyard has EXACTLY the conditions for the plant - including the rocky soil. So it's not really fair. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/laugh.gif[/img] I'll have to defer to any growers closer to you or one with more experience. Good luck with the seedling. They really are tough, and sometimes they seem to die with little reason. Keep us updated!
    A flytrap ate my homework!
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    Here's my experience with these plants:
    Last year during the summer, I sowed about 20 or 30 seeds of Drosophyllum outdoors in pots kept damp. The seeds were scarified, but only one germinated and it quickly died.
    During winter/spring, I tried again with a different batch of seeds, but this time I cut off part of the seed coat near the tip to reveal the white endosperm and soaked the seeds in distilled water. I changed the water every couple days, until the white tip started to elongate at which point, I removed the seeds and planted them in peat pots filled with sanderlite, pure sand, peaterlite:sand etc. The seedlings sat in water in a tray as the peat pots would dry out quickly in the sun.
    Once the seedlings grew their second set of leaves, I transplanted them to larger clay or plastic pots(7-10in). One of the large clay pots sat in around 4-5in of water in a plastic box the entire winter and part of spring. There were three plants in that pot, but one died within a couple weeks of transplanting. The other two are still alive and well.
    The other pots were placed on a porch with stong sunlight. I believe that multiple plants can be grown together as I have two pots with two plants and one pot with three plants. My favorite soil for Drosophyllum is pure silica sand. I have other plants in sanderlite and sanderliteeat, but it is annoying when I water from the top as the perlite floats to the surface.
    BTW: I also live in CA and the weather is well suited to these plants...What works here may not work well in other places.

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Jan and Kamil from BestCP posted a travellog from their trip. About the best information I have seen on the topic! Excellent pics and insight into the natural habitat and a lengthy section on cultivation.

    BestCP Drosophyllum
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    Thanks for the information all. Maybe someday I will try it again. I am ashamed to say that despite GA3, fresh seed, sun ripened seed, nicking, scraping and sanding the seed, soaking the seed, pouring boiling water on the seed, using umpteen million substrate and moisture combo's that I have NEVER germinated a single flipping seed, and this is one on of my most wanted plants: number 55 on a list of about a thousand, lol.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    dont they do GREAT in places like san fransisco and san diego?

    also i heard cutting off or nicking a piece of the outer coating of the seed helps.

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    Well, I'm in Los Angeles, and a particularly deserty part. It does awesome outside. But it's tough to germinate and get past the small stage despite that. Mine took MONTHS to germinate. The ones I have drying again right now are almost a year old now. I think I'm going to use CP2K's advice and take off the tip. I already scarify all of them but I guess that's not enough.
    A flytrap ate my homework!
    -Michelle

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    Lightbulb

    Hey everyone,

    I hope someone sees this and can answer my questions. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    I received 5 drosophyllum seeds from D. Muscipula a few weeks ago, I lost 3 and 2 germinated. I have recently transplanted the oldest seedling to its permanent pot. While I was taking the seedling out of its container I noticed that the bottom was black, well there is this black stringy thing that connects the actual seedling to the seed. I would like to know if that black stringy thing is roots or is my seedling dying? The seedling's two oldest leaves are drying out too, but I think there are new ones coming up. Should I give up on this seedling?

    Also when exactly should I transplant seedlings to a bigger pot and how much water should I give a seedling once it is in its permanent pot? Thanx a lot for the info, Sincerely, LA Traphole

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