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Thread: New cv. of spat?

  1. #1
    HellzDungeon's Avatar
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    i have this spat that makes flowers that have extra everything [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Its not just on one flower, all the flowers that opened had the same traits [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    here are the pics
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/hellzdungeon/DSCN2127.jpg[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/hellzdungeon/DSCN2133.jpg[/img]
    here are some other flowers as well as my D filiformis tracyi
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/hellzdungeon/DSCN2130.jpg[/img]
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/hellzdungeon/DSCN2131.jpg[/img]
    lots of seed coming soon [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    look out for a give away soon
    Hellz
    Nike SB is Bananas

  2. #2

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    HD that is a very interesting plant! Such abberant flowers are a good indicator that this individual is a polyploid, probably as a result of mutation which affected the cell division. These genetic accidents are often the beginning of new species if the mutant form becomes successful and can out compete other members of the population. This was the case with Drosera anglica. Previous to an accident that resulted in a polyploid hybrid, the natural hybrid D. rotundifolia x D. linearis was infertile, but polyploidy gave the plant a complete set of chromosomes, and the resulting seed was then fertile.

    Cv. refers to a "cultivar". Almost any plant can be published as a cultivar, it is up to the author to decide if it is different enough to warrant cultivar status.

    Usually the cultivars are published to focus on a desirable characteristic for plants anticipated to be widely distributed, but desirable is a subjective term. All that is needed is for publication is for the plant to have a visable, describable difference that is reproducable.

    Take care of any seed that is produced and sow another generation. If the character is stable, you will have a basis for publishing as a cultivar. I also sudggest you try some leaf cuttings and see if the resulting plants also have this characteristic.

    For the record, this is the first example of this I have ever seen in D. spatulata. Pretty neat.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    BobZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Take care of any seed that is produced and sow another generation. If the character is stable, you will have a basis for publishing as a cultivar. I also sudggest you try some leaf cuttings and see if the resulting plants also have this characteristic.
    Stability of characteristics in seed offspring is not a requirement of a cultivar. Many cultivar descriptions emphasize asexual (vegetative) reproduction only.

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    Yes, this is true. The interest in the seed is more to determine if the plant will produce fertile seed with the same character. I am not too clear on this myself, but I assume it would. Maintaining the cultivar character by seed is not a requisite by any means, but it would be interesting to know if the F2 generation carried the trait.
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    HellzDungeon's Avatar
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    i think ur right, its prob a poly ploid, i found several others flowers on other plants that have multiple parts, and i would post pics of them, but my camera has no batts, and is recharging. if what u say is true, i can make a new speices of sundew!?
    that would be awsome [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Hellz
    Nike SB is Bananas

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    There is more to species than just form, so I would have to answer in the negative. A new "species" must have a distribution beyond the population it is found with, I think. Fernando could probably answer this better than I can, since he has indeed published several species, but I can tell you one off examples do not a species make.
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    HellzDungeon's Avatar
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    ok, i got you, but u said polyploidy parent make their offspring fertile, then if i cross pollinate the polyploidy plants with other plants, the resulting seed might be fertile? also, if i tryed to cross the polyploids with VFT since their closely related, would it have a chance to work?
    Hellz
    Nike SB is Bananas

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    HD,

    Plant genetics is not one of my strong points so I can't really answer except generally. VFTs and Drosera cannot cross and produce seed that will develop normally, although seed may be produced. The fact that this example may be polyploid makes no difference. The two genera are not that closely related (which is why they are placed in seperate genera).

    Seed from your plant will likely be fertile, but more than this I can't say. You will have to make the experiment and let me know how it turns out regarding the number of petals on the next generation of plants, and if all or only some of the offspring have this form.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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