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Thread: New cp grower : to try or not to try?

  1. #9

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    Well, sounds easy enough...
    So, how fast is the growth for the seed to become a big and strong plant?
    If the dragon is bigger than his treasure, it's not worth the effort.

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    BobZ's Avatar
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    It would be an interesting experiment to have a number of individuals of the same species growing side by side under identical conditions and let some flower and others where the flower is removed. I expect that some species will show a dramatic difference and others will not. Some species flower seasonally and a slow-down in growth may be a normal seasonal process that coincides with flowering, but not caused by the flowering itself. In annual species, production of flowers is in preparation for oncoming death and growth rate may not matter whether flowering is successful or not.

  3. #11
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Hi Cath, and welcome to the forums! This is my first year of true CP cultivation and I have some of my Droseras flower. My intermedia, spatulata, anglica don't seem to mind the process. My capensis 'alba', however, looks very haggard. I cut its scape several weeks ago and it is finally sending up normal, new leaves.

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    flytrap59's Avatar
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    Sszvein, To answer your qusetion about "how long" for mature plants; I've found 3 years to be average for the species you've listed. I've got a slew of tiny capes that I started from seed last fall. They're about 1/4 inch across now. My 2nd year capes are about an inch or so high.
    Professor Carrington..\"We owe it to science to stand here and
    die rather than destroy a source of
    wisdom\".

  5. #13

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    To answer the question "How long from seed to plant?" you would need to go species by species as they differ. Some like D. spatulata mature within a single year. Others take longer, maybe a year and a half to flowering size granting good growing conditions.

    The thing with seed is to keep sowing it in a regular process. That way there are always different species in different stages of growth, and you don't get frustra ted waiting for something to happen. I keep sowing and checking, and there is always something happening.

    I like Bob's idea for that experiment. I think that it's true that some species will be indifferent to the scape removal. My own feelings are that flowering and seed set are part of the natural cycle of a plant species, and a well grown plant will not be deeply affected by flowering - or, if it is, then this is the natural consequence. With all these seedy Drosera species, it is best to maintain a regular cycle of sowing and growing to maintain the species in the collection, also caring as much as possible for the mother plants since with age comes character.

    BTW, I regularly let my Dionaea flower without any discernable effect in the majority of instances, (there are exceptions to very rule).

    In less ideal conditions, it might be another matter entirely, and scape removal may be justified. These are all worthy questions to be explored and discussed.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  6. #14

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    To answer your question about maturity I have heard D.intermidia reach maturity (at which point flowering occurs madly), in no less than three months, at optimal conditions. It all matters on how you grow it. Hmmm...now that I think about it, how do you tell if a plant reaches maturity?

    Good luck with the seeds, if you get them. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #15

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    Right. *Taking notes*
    So answers range from a few months to a few years, ok then.

    Experiment are always very useful, as it give accurate, reliable data to work with to get better understanding, and thus better result.
    I will try to obtain some D. venusta seeds from Tamlin if he still has some left and try to grow half of them normally, and then half of them through tissue culture. (I am a science student after and have access to a lab, if not, I'll just have to do it home-style in my kitchen, bless those chemistry classes!)
    I'll compare growth speed, hardiness and development differences between the two. I'll send you the data as I go. (if it works, of course!)
    If the dragon is bigger than his treasure, it's not worth the effort.

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  8. #16
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    i find that cuttings usually leed to mature plants faster than seed on most

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