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Thread: Storing drosophyllum seed

  1. #9
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    i placed them between two larges pieces of sand paper and rubbed the crap out of them untill theres gray powder that looks like ash. that's the seed coat. when i was done the seeds looked very grey instead of black. it's my first time doing this so i dont know when to stop, so i stopped when they turned grey.

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    That's interesting. I never knew you had to scarify seeds. When you mentioned it, I thought you just had to sneek up on them and scare the crap out of them [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img].

    Actually......though, I was curious how they do this naturally. How do they manage to sprout on their own in nature if they need scarifying?
    The mind is like a parachute, it only works when it's open.

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    how did you keep the seeds from falling down, are they big?
    Join the CCPS, you wont regret it: http://s4.invisionfree.com/CCPS

  4. #12
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    i think that the seed coat is scratched off by sand or rocks or something. maybe wind erodes the seed coat with sand. i dunno if this is what really happens but it's a thought.

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    I doubt it. The seeds can germinate without scarification, but this takes much longer.

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (CP2k @ Aug. 28 2004,12:42)]I doubt it. The seeds can germinate without scarification, but this takes much longer.
    True. But there is much better and consistent germination if the seed coat is scratched (scarified). Take a look at the habitat conditions shown at
    http://www.bestcarnivorousplants.com...usitanicum.htm

    Many plants that grow in such dry rocky locations require some seed treatment such as scarification or fire which signals that conditions have changed and there is now an increased chance of successful establishment. One such condition that scarifies seed is a landslide or a debris torrent following intense thunderstorms.

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